Cutting Board - Sanding

I made several cutting boards for friends and relatives as Christmas presents. When I delivered the boads (laminated strips of 1 inch hardwood ) they were a smooth as silk. In the couple weeks since, the boards have small fibres sticking up that create a rough surface. (Probably from washing)
I have re-sanded a few and in just a couple minutes they are smooth again.
Question is: What can I do to esnure that once they are sanded they will stay smooth?
Should I emerse the boards in water for a few minutes and sand when dry? Is there a wood treatment that will work better?
This is my first time working with hardwood. Any tips are appreciated.
Thanks,
Peter
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Hi Peter, Did you treat them with mineral oil before delivery? If not the fuzz is normal as water will raise the grain/fibres. Once sanded and oiled they should be ok assuming their owners know enough not to soak then in the sink or dishwasher. Cheers, JG
Novice wrote:

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Nope. Doesn't matter how you try, water will get in. Mineral oil or even poly won't close all the new cuts and notches water can use. Best is to remind folks of the inevitable, encourage them to use something like those rough green 3M scrubbing gizmos to clean the surface, which will remove particles originating from without or within.
BTW, check what detergent does to oils, and you'll find out about the inevitable. Mineral oil never "cures."

normal
ok
dishwasher.
hardwood )

small
again.
Is
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Scraping is better than sanding. Take 'em back, scrape, oil, rub in. Wilson

hardwood )

small
Is
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Folks,
Thanks for the responses. I didn't use mineral oil on them first. I understand now that I should use 10 parts mineral oil to 1 part parafin wax. heat in the mircowave until the wax melts and rub in vigorously.
Guess I'll go about recovering them all, scrape, sand and oil.
Future deliveries will include cutting board care instructions and some mineral oil. My friends are all brilliant and don't need instructions, don't know about my relatives....
Peter

hardwood )

small
Is
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 06:55:39 GMT, "Novice"

When wood gets wet, it raises the grain. I've used this technique--wet, allow to dry, sand, and repeat. The wood will raise less and less with each cycle. Softwood does the same. When dry, heat the board (120 degrees) and apply mineral oil and wip off the excess.
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hardwood )

small
Is
I have made quite a few cutting boards, and I found that you can minimize, if not eliminate, the fuzz. I glued up the most recent board from maple, cherry and purpleheart, sanded to 220, and dunked it in water. After it dried, I sanded again to 200 and dunked again. Once more of the same, and then put mineral oil on it, once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year, and then again if the board gets resurfaced. I have found that no matter whatm you still get raised ridges caused by knife marks, and a little bit of fuzziness. It tends to go away when the board dries out.
Jon E
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