Custom Drill press table

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Take another look and be sure to check out Anne's paintings. Very nice!
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Bob wrote:

Nice table Bob and Anne's painting are terrific!
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Thanks! Bob
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Nice pictures, Bob. However, that main menu is encroaching on your pics & text. Keep up the good work. Joe
Bob wrote:

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Very nice; great page as well. I have been looking around for a while for a plan for a good drill press table and played with my own designs as well. The C-Clamp routine gets old sometimes, especially when you run out of hands.
Are you satisfied with the table? Would you do it again?
Paul
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wrote:

I am very, very pleased with the enhancement of a drill press table. Just about any kind of table with a fence and T-track clamps is a big improvement. I haven't used the vertical side much but when I do, its a lifesaver.
A+ features: 1. the clamps I used. They are much better than the whimpy blocks and toggle clamps recommended by the plans. 2. Horizontal fence - nothing special - it just works. 3. The method of attachment to the cast iron drill press table - adjustable and rock solid. 4. Spar varnish finish. This thing is going to last a lot longer and look prettier than my other shop-made gizmos.
Pretty but non-essential 1. router cut circular cutout in rear of table (doesn't really buy anything) 2. Router cut circular cutout in fence. A v-notch would be nearly as effective. perhaps no notch is really needed anyway. 3. Router cut circular cutout on right angle brace - its just pretty.
Nice, but a lot of work 1. Vertical part of table with vertical fence.
Essential but missing 1. Clamps near the center of the table. 2. Sacrificial, easily replaceable insert in the middle of the table.
Note that the center part of the table (between the two T-tracks) is actually removable, but I just cannot bare to drill into a nice piece of baltic birch. I also think that having to unscrew to replace it is a pain in the butt. I'm going to make a drop-in rectangle section with replaceable plywood or MDF insert.
Bob
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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I've never used a stop on the fence. Maybe its because I don't have one. I cannot think of when I would use it, except (like the table saw) to make repetitive holes in similar pieces. A simple stop with an F-clamp will be what I'll use until I see the need. It would be easy to add T-track on the existing fence.

I have to move it to use the vertical fence. Just last night I had to drill some carefully placed 5/8" holes in the end of small block of wood. I used the vertical fence and I'm impressed with how well it works, once set up. The only way to do an equal job would be with router/jig or a horizontal boring machine, which I don't have.
For horizontal use, I find myself occasionally sliding the table forward or backward an inch. As I think about it, the T-track beneath is overkill if you just plan to use only horizontal. Go with your idea and add T-track later if you find the need. T-track is big pain - I used a dado blade which worked well, but I hate the labor of setting up a Dado blade.

It gives an extra inch or so. I guess I'd probably miss it, if it were not there. When you move the table too far back, the raise/lower handle on the drill press bangs into the table.
> > Essential but missing

Not a good idea. I don't want to end up accidentally drilling holes in the center mounted T-track. I'm in the "thinking-designing" phase and will come up with something or find a website that already had the great idea. It amazes me how many drill press tables slap T-track around the periphery - useless in my opinion. Also some of the drill press fences are festooned with T-track. I see it on a table saw or router table where you are moving wood past the cutter, but a drill press????

Melamine is fine if you have it or like working with it. It serves no real added value on a drill press because you are not sliding wood across the table. Its pretty, though. Actually a drill press table is as low tech as it gets - just be sure its reasonably flat and stable material.
Bob
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I've done that a few time. It is handy for repetive things like countersunk holes in a table top slat. I move it tot he left stop to drill the right hole, the right stop for the left hole.

I can get small pieces (most less than 24") for free. Even made a table top with a larger piece that I got. A display company in the same building as our company often has some nice trash.
I'll take a piece if I like the color. They did some work in Barney purple. I passed on that stuff.
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what I have now is a mill-drill. it has a large cast iron table with T slots milled into it- the table is about half taken up with slots. it allows positioning clamps, fences, dogs and whatnot anywhere on the table. very convenient.
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T-track on the table makes more sense than a lot of T-track on the fence to me.
Bob
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wrote:

So damn nice having the rip fence and miter fence for lining up repetitive things like hardware holes in drawer faces and things like that... For stops, I either lock the miter fence or use a clamp (the "squeeze" type") over the fence with a block of wood..
I've also made a couple of expanding stops that sort of resemble bench dogs.. they can slide in the miter fence slots and lock where you need them...
BTW: as long as the poster is building his own table, he might as well have slots on the table surface to hold feather boards, right?
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