curved wall on kitchen island - can I use bead board?


I am constructing a kitchen island that is the following shape: http://community.webshots.com/photo/2183768600092434605VdWBtr I would like to use bead board on the curved sides (other than the cabinets which line the straight side.) Can this be done? My designer says that bead board cannot be put over a curved wall. We are using wood skins to match the color of the cabinets (peppercorn). The walls other than the cabinets on the flat side will be custom built. Can bead board be stained to match the color of my cabinets (exactly)?
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Wot's bead board?
Tim w
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Are you being facetious?
http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLG,GGLG:2005-21,GGLG:en&q ¾ad%20board&sa=N&tab=wi

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No, we don't use that term here. I didn't know if he was talking about wooden tongue and groove boards or fluted MDF or something else entirely.
Tim W
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Tim W wrote:

At an architectural lecture some years back the young designers were relating their account of their description to the owner of a barrel vaulted ceiling. The designers said "beaded fir" and the owners heard "beaded fur". The surprising thing is that the owners trusted the designers enough that they were willing to let them proceed with their vision of the ceiling. Ultimately, the owners were relieved that it was wood and not pelt and everyone had a good laugh.
R
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Tim W wrote:

And why not, pray tell? "Beadboard" is a well-established architectural moulding pattern.
One could ask whether OP meant "real" beadboard or one of the "fake" sheet products, but unless told different I would assume "beadboard" means, well, beadboard.
http://vintagewoodworks.stores.yahoo.net/beadboard.html
For OP, depends on the tightness of the curve as others have said. If the ends are hidden by counter top, then that's not a problem. If not, you may have some difficulty finishing off the ends neatly.
Somebody else also mentioned about the finishing to match--of course, there's one other thing of what the wood species is and whether there's grain showing through the finish or not as well as color and gloss to worry about. That there i
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entirely.
I would assume you are in North America.
Tim W
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Tim W wrote: ...

Aha! I interpreted "here" as in r.w, not geographically, sorry...
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Oh, I see!
Tim W
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You may have to bevel the groove side of the T&G joint between boards, and may also have to play with the tongue side if the curves get too tight. And of course, you could get into custom milling if money is no object. The only problem I see is that the BB I'm aware of looks to be milled from 1x4 stock, with grooves in the center to look like another T&G joint. So installed on a flat wall, this will look like 1.5" boards. The fact that only every other "joint" is angled on a curved wall may look funny.

Probably not strictly true--you could certainly have the appropriate BB custom milled. But your designer's answer may be the realistic one given budgetary limitations.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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I meant to include a disclaimer on the note below. My comments are based on my very limited experience as a homeowner, using beadboard in a small laundry room. So take the limitations of my experience into account when reading my response. And I see from Dave (Teamcasa) that true individual board stuff, rather than the doubled pieces I got at the BORG, are available. In that case, I'd say your designer mis-spoke.

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Real bead board can make a pretty tight radius as it's individual slats, using ship lap joints or tongue and grove connections. The sheet bead board can bend - a little. You can increase it ability to bend by relief cuts on the back (1/2" apart), but that's a lot of cutting. The real cheap bead board made from thin MDF is more flexible.
I would suspect you could match the color using real bead board but the sheet bead board are generally primed and ready to paint.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You didn't mention which way you wanted to run the beadboard, but it can be curved in either direction. It will be easier to achieve a tighter radius running it vertically , but you can do it either way. The limiting factor will be the the tightness of the radii. If the curve is too tight the tongue won't want to slip into the groove and you'll have a wider bead (greater spacing between boards) than the rest of the field. Trimming the back of the board and tongue would help, but if you take off too much the joint won't stay tight.
Be aware that beadboard expands and contracts significantly and the joints will open and close with changes in temperature and humidity. This can look like hell on a finished piece.
As far as matching your cabinet finish exactly, hire a pro. I mean a real pro, not some painter for hire who has some experience in staining. Most likely matching the finish will take at least four or five steps. Sealer, stain, barrier coat, toner, finish.
R
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If the curve is a constant radius or is composed of several curves of constant radius, then it would be simple to vacuum-form the beadboard, I think, maybe.
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