Cross-cut sled

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Pat Barber notes:

And the older you get, the more it becomes "barely see".

Ayup.
Just talked to a major woodworking tool manufacturer, hand tool division, and we spent time discussing how measurements were taken and checked in ye olden days. Mostly, they weren't. Story sticks did the job, as they'll do it today. Simple, quick, repeatable almost unto infinity, and CHEAP!
Charlie Self "Bore, n.: A person who talks when you wish him to listen." Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary
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On Tue, 25 May 2004 14:45:04 GMT, Pat Barber

well, yeah, of course, but depending.....

I do some metalworking too, so I have tooling to measure WAAAY tighter than is needed for woodworking. I do my designwork on the computer, and sometimes I can't avoid having things come out in 64ths, as much of a pain as that is. I do avoid it where possible.

I've never used incra stuff. it seems to me to be well made and cleverly designed. My uneasiness with it is around the closed system thing- their stuff seems like it's designed to have you "need" another gizmo from their high priced line to do pretty much any next process.

But there is one very notable exception to the "32ths is all we need for woodworking" thing: toolmaking. This should be obvious to you, Pat. Shopmade tooling should be as accurate as you can make it, especially something as much used as a crosscut sled. It's not unreasonable to hold tooling to an order of mgnitude better tolerances than cabinets or furniture that are the actual product of the shop.

but you do want your crosscuts to come out nice and square, right? And without having to worry about them....

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I'll go along with the "tool maker" needing to use 1/64" where practical, but that comes into play very rarely for most folks.
In the construction of a cross-cut sled, measuring isn't really needed as much as being able to produce a "square edge", which can be done, with very little in the way of measuring....
snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

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On Tue, 25 May 2004 20:17:27 GMT, Pat Barber

yabbut.... the guy has some nice machinist grade measuring stuff and likes to use it. there sure ain't no harm done by dialing in a crosscut sled and the method he described is easy, fast and accurate....
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wrote:

That certainly may be the case, a methodology for adjusting a sled to square without measuring is certainly possible. The result and final precision will probably be very close to the same as obtained by using precise measuring tools and a couple of fine adjustments. The methodology I used with a few relatively inexpensive measuring tools was one I found to be relatively fuss-free, requiring only two tuning taps to the back fence to get the precision I desired.
As Bridger indicated, this effort was expended on a tool that I plan to make extensive use of in the future. I certainly do not use such measurements for assembly of furniture; my use of these precise measurements is reserved for setting up the equipment.

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