Cracks in wooden kitchen cabinets

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I posted incorrect links. Here is the whole thing (photo taken a year ago):
http://lukaszanddaria.homedns.org/k1.jpg
http://lukaszanddaria.homedns.org/k2.jpg
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When the wood shrinks a mitered joint will open on the inside. That is exactly what you have got. The fault (if there is any) might lie far back up the chain with the timber merchants, or with the designer who doesn't understand joinery, or with the architect who has made the atmosphere unecessarily dry, or with the Building control officer.... but for sure it will be the manufacturer who gets the grief and the blame, and indeed he might have known better.
I see nothing in the photos to suggest shoddy work, although the style of door is normally done with the cheapest foil-wrapped mouldings, and you have solid maple which is a bit strange. It is nothing to do with loose or glued panels - that is a total red herring. You stand no chance of closing the joint with screws, that will only make a mess. The best thing you can do is to obtain some special wood finishers filling wax colour matched to your wood and rub it into the crack. It will make it invisible... but won't prevent further movement (which you cannot do).
Tim W
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So what's the underlying mechanism for the joint opening up only on the inside? Is it that the width of the rails and stiles shrinks more than the length and, therefore, the miter angle changes from a perfect 45 to, say, 46 degrees?
Josh
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Yes. Wood does not shrink in length only in width (not really none, but the ratios of movement is something like 100:50:1 for parallel to the growth rings:across the growth rings:along the grain).
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Replace the doors. Better to look for stile-and-rail mortise joinery in new doors. Plus, make sure all sides are finished equally. Kitchen cabinets take a beating with steam and changes in heat/humidity.
On 9 Mar 2006 19:36:12 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Wanna bet? The doors are certainly not.
Therefore you will also want to suspect the cabinets themselves before you go spending money replacing doors.
Best bet is to find someone who knows what they are doing to check things out for you.
Unless you can find an honest/respected local cabinet maker (most have a tendency to bad mouth everyone's work but theirs), consider paying a licensed, third party building inspector for an honest appraisal of the cabinet's structural situation before paying good money for new doors.
Just a year? ... any homeowner warranty under your state's laws?
--
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Last update: 12/13/05
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On 9 Mar 2006 19:36:12 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

For some reason the wood has dried, cold dry winter maybe? Wood not dry when constructed? These may close back up in the summer. I'd say this is pretty normal for mitre joints.
You could also try to raise the relative humidity in your apartment. If the joints close, douse them with wax, maybe a hot melted carnuba/paint thinner mixture. Wax is supposed to be the best barrier againt moisture changes. (From FWW article)
-------------------- Steve Jensen Abbotsford B.C. snipped-for-privacy@canada.mortise.com chopping out the mortise. BBS'ing since 1982 at 300 bps. Surfing along at 19200 bps since 95. WW'ing since 1985 LV Cust #4114
Nothing catchy to say, well maybe..... WAKE UP - There are no GODs you fools!
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