Corded drill ratings

Page 1 of 2  
At the risk of asking a dumb question: are corded drills such a commodity item that there is no longer a purpose in worrying about anything other than specs for anything above the Harbor Freight quality level? I'm tempted to think so, but my landlord would have a problem with me burning down his house.
None of the normal things I look at seems to have ratings....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sledge Hammer wrote:

As far as burning down the house goes, if it's UL listed you're as covered as you're going to get.
Not much attention paid to corded drills these days since the cordless have gotten so good that corded drills are becoming niche products. Just look for a decent brand with the features you want.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

I bought a Skil to do sanding on the lathe, figuring it would succumb to the dust in short order. It is still working fine, but I got so aggravated with the stiff plastic cord that I ordered a replacement DeWalt cord and put on it. Now both my DeWalt and Skil drills have long flexible cords. Just something else to note when looking at tailed tools.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

GOOD!! I'm not the only one who gets pissed at stiff plastic cords... and here I thought I was weird...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
GOOD!! I'm not the only one who gets pissed at stiff plastic cords... and here I thought I was weird...
LOL thinking back to the 60's when I got my first B&D drill and jig saw around the age of 12, I recall B&D cords being so stiff that you could hardly get the tool and the cord back into the storage case.
That apparently led to the No cord at all, period, I don't know which was worse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wish vendors would put more effort into the "feel" of their hand drills, but I suppose for no marginl, it's not worth their time. You can get a name brand 3/8" drill for 40-60 I think. There's really no comparison still to a cordless for drilling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am a fan of many Harbor Freight items, but as you rightly suggest, consider only those drills above HF in quality. I picked up their cheapo 3/8" corded drill for about 10 bucks. Drills ok, except the one I have has a SUPER sensitive trigger. I swear a strong breeze blowing across the trigger will set the drill into motion. Kinda scary.
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Makita makes a light,inexpensive corded drill that is damn nice and very tough...
http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?IDc0 http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?IDA2 http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?ID13 http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?ID04
Sledge Hammer wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

I have a Makita similar to these, but discontinued: 6406. I got it for 30 bucks at a HD or Lowes closeout. It's only 3.3amp, but is remarkably strong. 0-2100 rpm. I wish it was 1/2, but it's only 3/8, yet keyless. I may get a 1/2 chuck for it next time they're on sale at HF.
Point is, I beat the crap out of this thing, drop it on the floor, off the roof. I use and abuse it, and it's still going strong, with only scratches to show for it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Have a Milwaukee I could say the same about. This one is an older model when the triggers were smaller. I don't care for the newer ones with the elongated trigger and ergonomic curve to the grip. I also have a milwaukee corded angle drill. Bought it reconditioned for a really decent price. Gets into places others won't, Has saved the day more than once. Even their reconditioned tools have a 5 year warranty.
Lenny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 08:12:08 -0800 (PST), Sledge Hammer

The worst corded drill is better than the best cordless drill, and cost a fraction. You can get a high-quality corded Milwaulkee drill for the same price of a decent cordless (about $150). Chances are very good ithe Milwaulkee will last a lifetime with some abuse, can't say the same for a "Chicago" brand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree about 80%. LOL, Please show me a corded drill with a "clutch", or a corded drill that will operate with out an electrical outlet or extension cord. I will probably forever have at least one with and with out a tail.
While the corded drill will operate, in many cases, as well as a cordless, a cordless drill is a particular power tool that is easily used in most any location and or position. Other corded tools, routers, jig saws, sanders, etc. typically are used on a level flat surface and the cords typically do not have to be dragged all over the work area. A corded drill tends to be carried around a lot more than any other corded tool, at least that is true in my shop.
But for power, the corded is very hard to beat and is always ready if electricity is available. I very much prefer a corded drill for actually drilling holes, not so much for driving screws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Obviously you're not serious about the second part, but for the clutch you just have to look around a bit. The Milwaukee 6580-20 and 6780-290 both have a clutch, as does the Makita 6827. On the other end of the spectrum, there is the Black&Decker DR330B and the Ryobi D46CK. I'm sure there are others.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a POS "cordless", brand long forgotten, that ran off its battery *or* a corded adapter that plugged where the battery would go. Good concept, but it has the relationship backwards. What we really want is the power of a corded drill that can run on batteries for portability. What they built was an anemic cordless that had a backup power source. (The battery was a cheap NiCad that died way too early in its service life. I stopped struggling with it when the brushes started sparking, also too early in its life.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a Skil that did that. It was great! At 9.6V, it'd drive 2" screws all day long (on AC, of course) but could only do 4-5 3" screws before tripping the overload.
My Makitas are leaps and bounds better, but I still like the idea that one drill/driver can be cordless, until you run out of power, and then go corded and charge the battery at the same time. Although... with 3 batteries it's easy to keep flipping between the charger, drill and impact driver.
Puckdropper
--
On Usenet, no one can hear you laugh. That's a good thing, though, as
some writers are incorrigible.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

That was it. I replaced it with a cheap corded Dewalt and been happy ever since. Except it didn't have a clutch. I got a tiny Milwaukee li-ion to partner with it after I stripped out too many screws driving them. The Milwaukee is kick-ass, too. It came with 2 batteries, although there wasn't really a need. The charge lasts essentially forever in my use, and recharges in 30 minutes. Quite pleased with both of them. There's no replacing a real corded drill when you need what they do: 2500 rpm and 6 amps of torque.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Chris Friesen" < wrote

Back in the day, I bought a clutch at a lumberyard for $30. I just chuck it up and put my drivers in it. It wasn't great, but it worked. I used it to build a lot of furniture, etc.
When I got my Makita cordless drills, it got tossed out. The new drivers were much better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been using the Ryobi for oh, about a year now. It's not a bad drill at all. The chuck leaves something to be desired, and if I push it hard I can smell the fact that it's not happy about it. But that's what the beat to hell Milwaukee next to it is for. A corded drill with a clutch is a very handy thing to have. It lives next to the workbench always ready to go. For 30-40 bucks I can't complain. I'll put a decent chuck on it when this one is toast, and when the drill itself dies I'll buy another one, and I still won't have paid as much as a cordless.
-Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the update! I'll take a look at those.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dewalt DW281 also. Be careful of those. Like the Milwaukees and the Makita, it takes 1/4" hex bits only. The B&D and Ryobi have 3/8" chucks. The irony is the "big" names have big power and speed, while the ones with chucks spin only 1100 rpm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.