Compressor question : Followup

Thanks for all the responses to my previous question.
Here are a couple of things I have learned by talking to some people around town... 1. Home Depot in Rhode Island has been getting alot of returns of the Ridgid compressors. None of the sales floor are recommend them due to the high number of returns. 2. Although the oil-lube models are quieter, finish carpenters are using oil-less inside because the oil-lubed models spray oil. I was told that you need to make sure the oil-lube compressor is not near a wall because of the spray. 3. Dewalt seems to be the brand of choice around here. 4. The PC compressor that comes with the finish nailer kit will drive a framing nailer, although not very well.
Thoughts on these thoughts ?? Thanks again.
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They have a wide range of compressors, and I imagine they're made by several different companies. The larger oil-lubed compressors look like they're made by Campbell Hausfield, which for the most part are decent quality. The smaller oil-less compressors look pretty cheap and overpriced for what you get.

I have two oil-lubed compressors and neither of them spray oil.

The local rental houses around here carry Dewalt compressors. They're made by Emglo and seem to be ultra reliable.

It depends on your use. It won't keep up to a lot of rapid fire use but otherwise it'll be fine.
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I question that. Pressure is pressure. The volume is controlled by the air hose and fittings. Unless the framing nailer is bumped repeatedly, it should work as well with the PC as a 150 HP industrial compressor.
If you are putting sheathing on and hitting the gun 20 or 30 times, OK, it may get low on pressure. The average DIYer will bang three nails and put the gun down to get another stud. Depending on your use, the PC may be a good buy for you. I like mine, but I don't build houses with it.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote

The hose and fittings have the least effect on volume. The pressure regulator does the heavy lifting.
Dave
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Actually you can only have so much air go through a restricted path with a given pressure. The length of hose and diameter of the hose will have a direct effect on the volume of air that passes through it. That is why there are larger diameter hoses for large volume users. You can remove the pressure regulator all together and the volume of air that comes from a large diameter hose vs. a small diameter hose will be greater given the pressure is the same.
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True to an extent. But were are generally talking about woodworking applications where a pressure regulator is the major contributor in controlling volume and final pressure. Specifically the kinds of compressors discussed in the original post. Now, if we were talking about jack-hammers or other super high volume uses you would be more accurate.
Dave

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Yeah... I was simply thinking of the actual physics of the matter rather than the usages limited to a home shop.
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wrote:

I seem to remember my brother using a lil' dinky craftsman compressor and a huge tank to paint trucks with...
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Not really. Painting does not take a lot of air volume. Body tools do. Hook a DA up to a compressor and you'll immediately see what volume is - or isn't. The bigger tank does have more air volume - initially, but the smaller compressor cannot adequately refill it as it bleeds down, for high air volume tools. You'd have to build a cascade system in order to cheat the system and then you'd only cheat it to a point. Look at all of the 60 and 80 gallon compressors that only deliver 10-12scfm that are out there. At the same time there are compressors that deliver 18-27scfm mounted on those same sized tanks. The real delivery is at the pump, not at the tank.
That said, if you're not using really high volume air tools like a DA, then a larger tank will offer you some more air to work with between cycles, but the pump is going to cycle longer to fill it. Those longer cycles are what is going to build up high levels of moisture, toast your piston rings (the small ones are not meant for continuous duty), and generally wear it out.
--

-Mike-
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 12:08:36 GMT, "Mike Marlow"
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
wot he sed.
large tanks simply fill a gap. ***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
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My take:
Buy the biggest compressor you can.
Bolt it to the floor.
Buy hose.
I would rather buy another 200' of hose than dick around with a dinky pancake. Cost would be the same or less. I would add a regulator and holding tank, but I already have those on hand.
Granted, if taking the show on the road is a concern, that's a different matter.
As I have said before, get the biggest compressor you can, that just means it will take longer for you to see it as small.
And stay away from oiless, their frigging annoying. I have a oil lube compressor that slings oil but, it's shot (it's also my holding tank). If I had to use it by itself I would take a longer hose.
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Mark

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Snip

That sounds like a "load of",,,,,,, maybe a nail gun that requires oil. I have been around compressors for the last 33 years and have never witnessed any compressor spray oil unless it was worn out.

That sounds like a load also. A framing nail gun is really no more taxing on a compressor that a finish nail gun unless you are rapid firing almost continuosly.
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My pancake compressor cycles a bit when shooting roofing nails but I was shooting nails a lot faster than I would shoot framing nails. The compressor keeps up good enough for the 35 square or so of shingles I put up.

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