Compact Flourescent Lamps

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: How long do you think mercury vapour stays airborne? The stuff sinks : like a stone.
Have a look at what you need to do to cleap up a CFL - requires being down near the floor.
    -- Andy Barss
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You mean like Pluto the dog, sniffing a trail? Who puts their face/nose on the floor when they're cleaning? I suspect in some cases, some spilt Peruvian Marching Powder might compel some to 'snort the floor'...
Or does mercury 'hover' on your planet? (hint: it's very heavy)
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It does indeed 'hover' on my planet. (hint: it has a non-zero vapor pressure.)
http://www.ilpi.com/msds/ref/vaporpressure.html
http://www.ilpi.com/safety/mercury.html
Lead Oxide also readily volatilises.
--
FF


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Only if the CFL was hot when broken and the other items cold.

Wrong.
Mercury liquid and the mercury vapor above it will form an equilibrium that is temperature dependent. As mercury vapor is removed from the air above the liquid more will evaporate until all of the liquid is gone. While the vapor pressure of mercury is low at room temperature, it is readily absorbed into the human body by inhalation, and is not nearly so readily eliminated.
Thus spilt mercury in your environment will continuously accumulate in the persons who breathe the air in the environment until it is all removed from that environment.
--
FF


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wrote:

Smaller tube. Less Hg needed.
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Rick Samuel wrote:

My shop is full of them.
On a side note, they make great tool mounted lamps, as there is no filament to fail due to vibration.
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B A R R Y wrote:

The big problem I have with them is that they don't work worth crap with any kind of electronic control. Not just dimmers, but they have trouble with any X10 stuff or the like that doesn't use a mechanical relay.
--
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--John
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I have two on X-10, one on the appliance module, the other on a lamp module. Works OK but I never need to dim those two. They are good in places that need night lights or in difficult to reach fixtures as they last a long time. I'll never convert 100% though, they can't do it all.
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Well, a real, and helpful answer, thanks. I have a few mag. switches.
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Are you using "Dimmable" Fluorescents? They work well for me but they are about 4x more expensive.
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B A R R Y wrote:

You can get CFLs rated for ceiling fan use. They have higher vibration tolerance.
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Jim Harvey wrote:

But do you need them?
"Regular" CFLs have been great for me in tools, ceiling fans, and garage door openers.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Garage door opener, now that might be a really good application, thanks for the idea.
Other than that, I haven't been very happy with the quality of light from CFL's. They're OK for the porch lights since they save some money on electricity (although they seem to attract more bugs with the extra UV). The last batches I've bought seem to last a bit better than earlier versions, such that they may be lasting long enough to actually save money.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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High blue output. 15 or 25 watt cool white CFLs make excellent, inexpensive plant grow lamps. While you might not like the dead blue spectrum, plants absolutely flourish under it.

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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 22:31:46 -0700, Father Haskell wrote:

Yes, they do. But they do even better with the 6500K ones. Especially in an aquarium.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Be aware that they take a while to come up to full brightness in the cold. I see it as an annoyance, but it's definitely a negative.
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: B A R R Y wrote:
:> Jim Harvey wrote: :>> :>> You can get CFLs rated for ceiling fan use. They have higher vibration :>> tolerance. :> :> But do you need them? :> :> "Regular" CFLs have been great for me in tools, ceiling fans, and garage :> door openers.
: Garage door opener, now that might be a really good application, thanks : for the idea.
: Other than that, I haven't been very happy with the quality of light from : CFL's. They're OK for the porch lights since they save some money on : electricity (although they seem to attract more bugs with the extra UV). : The last batches I've bought seem to last a bit better than earlier : versions, such that they may be lasting long enough to actually save money.
I've had much the same disappointing experience. Several didn't last long, and overall the quality and intensity of light doesn't seem up to snuff. Dimmer (even ones that are supposed to exceed the replaced incandescents in lumens), and off somehow.
I'm hoping for breakthroughs in LED manufacturing, so we can leapfrog over the CFLs.
    -- Andy Barss
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Based on what I have seen in North Carolina with their little experiment with LED's in stop lights, they have a ways to go....
Maybe down the road but the current versions are not up to the task.
Andrew Barss wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

What problem are you seeing? Around here they're being installed on an attrition basis and seem to be working fine.

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They started installing them "about" 4-5 years ago and I have noticed a fairly consistent outage of the individual "lights" that make up the entire signal.
Ex: The green light is made up of several leds and a few will go out after a period of time. I didn't pay much attention to that until I noticed that a LOT of the lights had the same issue.
This might have a LOT to do with the vendor that supplies the lights to the state.
Maybe it's a design feature that keeps the light going even if there is a partial failure ???
J. Clarke wrote:

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