Color of cherry

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On 11/12/2010 7:24 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Ed Zachary! I just don't understand all this yap about forcing Cherry to darken using noxious chemicals, and it goes right back to what I said about us living in a world of instant gratification. I don't know that I've ever seen "forcibly" darkened Cherry, but I'd be damned surprised if it looked anywhere near as good as Cherry that's been left alone to do its own thing.
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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wrote: [snipperized]

Amen, brother, amen!
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I like instant gratification. Especially if I can get it a few times in a row.
To be honest, the first time I darkened Cherry using my chemical soup I almost gratified in my pants I loved the look so much.
There is a long and proud tradition of using the chemicals nature gave us in my area of furniture design, namely Craftsman, Stickly influenced, etc. They used amonia fuming for 100 years. Other than shellac every film finish is a chemical mix.
As far as how good it looks? I have a 100+ year old rustic Cherry side table and the chemical treatment is the only thing that every got close to the lovely deep color of that piece. 100 years of oxidizing in an instant. Trust me, a little sunshine ain't gona do anything like this in 10 years.
I have never understood this religious adherance to the natural color of Cherry. I stain it, piss on it, use minwax ploy shades, aniline dyes, water based pigment stains, toned lacquer and all sorts of abominations and every piece more lovely than the last.
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Do an alcohol test on old shellacked cherry. What rubs off isn't superblonde.
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It may be that your garden cherry is not the same cherry that is normally felled for timber. I am no expert on cherry species but istr in europe at least that the timber from a fruit bearing orchard tree was indeed pale in colour.
Tim W
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Jim
Please comment, if you will, about the sizes of the wood after milling. Please include the height of the main trunk if possible.
Thanks Bob AZ
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wrote:

Since he felled it, the height of the main trunk is equal to the diameter.
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On 11/12/2010 10:14 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

<Groan> :-)
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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Bob AZ wrote:

Well, after milling each plank was about 4/4 thick, 10-12 feet long and maybe 12" wide. The tree itself was about 60' high.
-Jim
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Nice!!! How many planks?
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For cherry wood that I buy from local hardwood vendors I use boiled linseed oil, next day a coat of shellac(sanding sealer style, no wax) and then poly or lacquer or whatever. The BLO instantly gives the hi pro glow. In a couple of years the color is absolutely stunning.
RP
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BLO followed by French polish with orange shellac = perfection.
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I often find it difficult to distinguish cherry from maple in a lumber yard especially of the some of the maple has dark spots. Chery tends to be a tad more tan than maple when new and darkens greatly with exposure to sunlight.
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Just put the Cherry wood in sunlight for a day or so , it darkens up nicely or finished project in sunny room. Most cherry furniture you find in stores is stained or coloured maple ect. to look cherry. The Chatoyancy of oiled cherry is it's own thing, nothing quit like it

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Usually the sapwood of black cherry is light yellow, heartwood is brownish, but the color will darken upon exposure to a deep reddish brown.
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