Color of cherry

Page 2 of 3  
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

My brother bought some cherry lamp tables and a coffee table around 1970 from an Amish place in Indiana. They are still the original color (medium tan). They had a tung oil finish.
Around 1990 I was making a set of kitchen cabinets of cherry. I needed a piece of wood for a jig and used an extra piece of cherry, wiped it down with linseed oil. It was deep, dark red within 3-4 years. Because of the BLO? No idea.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Unless exposed to sun light.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I always assumed most wood darkening was from UV exposure. Clear coats do not stop UV penetration well, at all.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sun light will darken most woods and eventually turn them grey if exposed long enough. Sun light will also lighten some woods.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sunlight has darkened my Tiger Wood (not golf related) hardwood floors a lot. I doubt they would ever go grey, though. ALl the matching and prep for this floor ..about 1200 sq. ft. and now it is all deep red with the black stripes and swirls in it. We think we will start lifting up the carpet in the middle on vacations. The lines are so distinct it may never fade evenly...LOL
After finishing the floor area I threw a wrecked piece out on the deck (rain, direct sun on south side and snow) for a year and a half now. The wood colour has darkened a lot, the urethane finish looks a bit duller but not cracked, split or harmed, as far as I can tell. I cconsidered doing the deck in exotic hardwoods after reading about it's durability. Drilling every deckscrew hole would have been a bitch though. Stuff is so friggin' hard though.

.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Some do, and some don't.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not likely to darken in storage unless exposed to the sun.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 08:42:56 -0600, Steve Turner

Not to mention that it's a MORTAL SIN to stain and poly cherry.
Yea, though I walk through the valley of death, I shall use neither stain nor poly on cherry.
-- To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure. -- J. K. Rowling
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I agree.....with a caveat. I love working with cherry. I have a bunch in stock, the origin of which is known to me. I like the smell, the way it takes detail, relatively stable and it this case not too expensive. So my last project was made with cherry and I blew 3 coats of MinWax Polyshades all over it. I got the Japanese dark red colour Angela wanted and my therapist thinks I stand a chance to be back on solid food within 3 weeks when he'll sign for a weekend pass.
The only other thing I had handy was 14" wide poplar, flat and straight and 12 feet long and 6/4, so no way was I going to hurt those boards.
oops, time is up, I must join the group and cut out some paper dolls...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:40:21 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Secret Stash time, wot?

Glad to hear of your recovery, but DON'T do it again, capice?

Grok that. I'da made a Borg run and come back with some nifty termite barf. And I wish I'd sprayed that last bit of polyshades I put on a client's rolling kitchen cabinet. They had it and said "Use this, period." 3 years of therapy later, I'm still having bad dreams about it.

Weave a basket for me, will ya, big guy?
xox
-- To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure. -- J. K. Rowling
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No basket weaving yet; too many pokey things. It took a special requisition to get the rubber scissors for doll-cutting. They're very nice scissors... black and green... German made... I can't make out the whole name.. Fe..s..tt. can't tell... too many teeth-marks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/2010 8:34 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Here, use this instead:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Festo-Festool-Simplex-30-Hammer-/290498640090?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43a31178da
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 06:34:39 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Grok that.

There, there. I understand. Just take your time.
-- To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure. -- J. K. Rowling
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try this one
http://www.finewoodworking.com/Materials/MaterialsArticle.aspx?id3618
I felled a black cherry tree in my yard and now I'm milling the wood from it. I am finding all of this wood to be about the color of Maple, maybe a wee bit darker. How come whenever you see any Cherry furniture or cabinets it is a dark reddish brown in color? Is it always stained?
-Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How come whenever you see any Cherry

Yes usually stained but you can darken Cherry "quasi" naturally using chemicals. Potassium dichromate specifically. It is in Drano, etc. but you can buy it full strength in powder form on ebay real cheap. It is a bit dangerous but works fantastic. If you leave it long enough it will go almost black, yet leave the variations of the underlying color.
I did some testing with Red Devil drain cleaner and the outcome was awesome. I have in the near future an "antiqued" Cherry bedroom set for myself and I'll probably build an extra set for sale. I just love the deep rich redish brown.
Read some about it here. http://www.bt3central.com/showthread.php?t=27343
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not an expert in wood finishing, far from it. However, as a (bio)chemist I have had experience with potassium dichromate. Specifically, we used to use it dissolved in concentrated sulfuric acid to make a really, really powerful cleaning agent for our glassware. That takes advantage of the extremely powerful oxidation capabilities of the combination of 2 powerful oxidizers. It hurts when you get it in the eye. Later, we were forbidden to use it because chromium (chromate is an anion derived from chromium) is a carcinogen. So, be careful with potassium dichromate - an oxidizer and a carcinogen.
I surmise that drain cleaners darken wood because of their very high pH. Be careful with lye etc. At high pH your skin and other proteins are dissolved quite effectively, and the lye wil keep eating away until it is either exhausted or really rinsed away. Acids are bad for you too, but at least they denature the protein and form something of a protective layer; lye just dissolves everything.
If yoy follow any directions for the use of chemicals, know what you are doing and understand and follow the directions.
Universal paid for healthcare isn't yet available for everyone here in the US ...
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Reason bases feel slippery is they react with skin oils to form soap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know if it's a combination of heat (Josepi's link?) and the chemical agent, but using K2Cr2O7 in direct sunlight will darken your wood a heck of a lot faster and with a darker shade, than applying it in a non-sunlit shop/environment. My uncle would apply it and, while still wet, flash it in direct sunlight for about 30 to 60 seconds and you could watch the darkness evolve in that time frame... darker and faster darkening, than when not exposed to sunlight.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sodium hydroxide, aka red devil lye, and aluminum filings. Add water, and it gets boiling hot, hopefully also boiling out whatever muck is clogging the drain. Pouring in a kettle of boiling water is cheaper, safer, and just as effective.
Potassium dichromate is used to photosensitize certain printmaking emulsions. Red crystals, no odor. Skin contact can result in ulcers. As with Drano, use common sense.

Flexner recommends orange shellac to warm up cherry or walnut's usually cold tone. I'd lean toward that solution, since it won't age too dark.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Father Haskell" wrote:

------------
Sodium hydroxide, AKA: "Caustic", "Caustic Soda".
Nasty stuff.
50% caustic is most common strength used to make soap as well as other basic products.
Definitely not something to screw around with unless you have training, especially when Mother Nature darkens cherry in 6-9 months or less just using normal daylight.
Patience is a virtue.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.