coating for shop concrete floor

In my continuing quest to make my new gar/shop habitable, I'm wanting to put some kind of coating on the concrete floor. All I want is to make it so that it's easier to clean up anything that is spilled, easier to sweep, etc. I see all sorts of options: concrete sealers of various formulation, floor paints, and 1- and 2-part epoxies. In the past, I've used the consumer-grade 2-part epoxy to cover the concrete floor in my basement, and after a few years, I'm underwhelmed with the durability. I'd appreciate any suggestions. I stopped by a Sherwin-Williams store today, but the guy that was there at the time wasn't very knowledgeable on these type of coatings.
todd
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In my continuing quest to make my new gar/shop habitable, I'm wanting to put
some kind of coating on the concrete floor. All I want is to make it so that it's easier to clean up anything that is spilled, easier to sweep, etc.
I see all sorts of options: concrete sealers of various formulation, floor paints, and 1- and 2-part epoxies. In the past, I've used the consumer-grade 2-part epoxy to cover the concrete floor in my basement, and after a few years, I'm underwhelmed with the durability. I'd appreciate any
suggestions. I stopped by a Sherwin-Williams store today, but the guy that was there at the time wasn't very knowledgeable on these type of coatings.
todd
SImple floor urethane in grey. It keeps the cement dust down and is reasonably reistant to abuse. Fancy just costs more money.
Keep in mind that whatever you use will have to recoated every few years and that spilled lacquer will disolve just about anything.
-Owen
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RE: Subject
Talk to an industrial flooring distributor.
They may be willing to do a once time cash transaction.
The good stuff will be 2 part epoxy based, and cost some serious money.
Those suppliers in the consumer trade won't have the good stuff.
BTW, lacquer thinner won't touch a properly cured epoxy.
Have fun.
Lew
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Thanks, Lew. I've bought precat lacquer from the Sherwin-Williams industrial location before, so I should be OK if that's the direction I decide on. I'm also stopping by a store that supplies both the trade and consumers tomorrow to talk to the manager about what he might suggest.
todd
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I used the two-part Sherwin Williams H&C epoxy in my shop. I picked the beige color so I wouldn't have to worry about sawdust so much.
Pictures and advice are here: http://www.mike-land.com/Woodworking/Paso_Wood_Shop/Floor_Painting/floor_painting.html
Mike Brown

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snipped-for-privacy@wood.com wrote in

I went with a simple grey in my model workshop. I figured a decent light grey would allow me to see tiny things I dropped. (Or that sprung out of my hands. Darn springs.) So far, I've only lost one tiny spring, but have dropped 3 or 4 small pieces.
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
marching band.
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Another vote for what Puckdropper says about the gray and ease of finding dropped parts. Don't get suckered into the speckles mixed into the paint - you won't be able to find a dropped wrench - LOL! Oh yea, I used Dura-cote. Easy to use and durable but about $90/ gal
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snipped-for-privacy@wood.com wrote:

If I were facing a similar situation, I'd think about putting down a wood floor. I'd be driven by a number of factors:
1. Easier to stand on - warmer as well.
2. More user-friendly, especially if the user is a just-sharpened chisel.
3. Easy enough to coat with whatever you choose - floor paint, epoxy.
4 Makes it slightly easier to bolt things to the floor.
Downsides:
1. More expensive than what you're thinking about.
2. Cuts your head space slightly. This may not be significant.
3. Every single piece of equipment in your shop must be removed before installing. With paint, you may choose to paint up to the edges.
Food for thought.
--

Tanus

www.home.mycybernet.net/~waugh/shop/
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When we moved into our new shop (I mean house) I had the garage and shop area finished. The first step was to clean with muratic (sp) acid to etch the concrete so that the finish bonded. We use Behr epoxy; three coats. It has been two years now and it has been great. I used a beige color. Roger
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Is this going to be a complete garage to shop conversion (ie: no cars... ever)?
If so, consider hardwood or plywood over sleepers. 'tavern' grade hardwood flooring can be had cheaply.
I'm in my shop 8-12 hrs a day and I sure wish I had something softer than concrete to stand on. Changing it over is definitely a 'one of these days' projects for me.
jc
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I've used 2-part epoxy (Behr) with the little paint flakes that you sprinkle over the wet paint. Results are "good" except for where the tires of my two cars sit (both front and rear). That wore thru pretty quickly. But the paint does make the garage/shop seem cleaner and easier to keep clean.
At the end of the garage where the noses of the cars point, I have a concrete "step" that runs the width of the garage and about 2' deep. I extended that another 2'-6" with 2x4 sleepers covered with two layers of 3/8" sheathing, then painted with that epoxy paint. That's where my workbench is located (about 16' long) with plenty of drawers underneath. That IS much more comfortable than standing on concrete: A little bit of "spring."
This is the second time I put down the 3/8" stuff. The first time I simply used crappy plywood that got waterlogged from moisture seeping thru the concrete. I pulled that up, put down a vapor barrier, put vent holes in appropriate places, and this seems better. I also primed every surface of the sheathing. This was done only about a month ago, so there's no telling how effective this solution might be. Wary, this time I did NOT use construction adhesive to bond the sheathing to the sleepers and to the two layers (that proved to be a real pain to remove). However, the 2x4's were set in Liquid Nails from the last flooring and that bond continues to hold very well. This time, minimal use of screws holds the sheathing to the 2x4's.
I "think" this will work out well.
Jim Stuyck
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I used the S W epoxy myself and it has worked very well. If you want cheap anti fatigue mats to walk on, have a look for used rubber conveyor belting (real cheap though it will need a cleaning)
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HF some some anti-fatigue mats, I think 4 2' squares runs about $7. (Watch for the sales, of course.)
Puckdropper
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marching band.
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'Garshop'--great word!
--
FF



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wrote:

It is a great word, but I don't think I can take credit for coining it. I'm sure I've read it here before.
todd
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I used 2 part epoxy from Pittsburgh Paints for both my shop and my garage floors, which were poured about 10 years apart, garage initially. I used (as recommended by Pittsburgh's dealer) their "solvent based" epoxy vs the water based type. They said the solvent based 2 part epoxy was used successfully by several nation wide automotive service and lube sites with great results. I also put a fine silica additive in the mix per their recommendations.(as a traction improver/slip and fall reducer...) The supplier stressed that the etching and cleaning of the surfaces to be coated was extremely critical to successful application and useful life of the product. Interestingly, my experiences after about eight years of the product in service has been mixed, the shop has been great, "bullet-proof", couldn't have asked for better results, however, the garage which is the oldest concrete (poured in 1989) has been almost exactly the opposite experience. Let me also note that both environments were prepared identically, thoroughly detergent/degreaser cleaned and acid etched twice with a final pressure washing then allowed to dry completely. The garage floor after about 2 years began "flaking" off chips of the coating in random areas of the floor some in traffic areas but as much from spots with no traffic at all. Examining the flaked off chips it appeared to be still bonded to the aggregate of the etched floor, but the sand in the aggregate had apparently separated from the concrete mix below it. During this time the shop floor looked like it had been coated a month ago and was completely intact in spite of tractors, mowers, pickups and other traffic. The garage only occasionally had a car parked on it. After many professional and private inspections and diagnosis's I believe what was different between the two floors (aside from age...) was that the shop was poured with a moisture barrier between the concrete and the gravel base contacting the ground soil. Looked like regular black plastic 4-6 mil or thereabouts. The garage didn't have the plastic and (apparently) was allowing moisture to leach up into the slab and create a cement powder just below where the coating had bonded to the etched floor when applied. I didn't resolve the garage issue although early on I retched and recoated it which again failed in two years or less. I moved to a different place before having a chance for any additional corrective action, which I was beginning to believe would be replacing the slab with one that had a moisture barrier below it or at least chipping out a fair amount of the surface and applying a self leveling polymer top coat of about an inch, similar to what they do when imbedding the tubing for radiant heat floors. I would be very careful to insure that where applying a water proof coating on concrete, that there is no way moisture can come through the slab. By the way the garage floor never looked "wet" and didn't have any other signs of it being suspect. Sorry for the long post, but if it prevents even one of you from having to deal with this sort of issue it is more than worth it. regards, Joe Life may not be the party we hoped for,But while we`re here we should dance
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Hello Preparation is of utmost importance if you don't give the concrete a profile the coating will most likely fail.. A good test is feel the floor does it feel like 100 grit sand paper if it does then it will be okay. There are several ways to accomplish this one is to acid etch it with hydrochloric acid another is to use a concrete grinding machine with a diamond cutters on it.
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