CLOSE THE DOORS!!! Shop Humidity concerns....

Is there any benefit to leaving the doors to the shop closed on especially humid days? Here in central New York we've been experiencing some rather humid weather (70 to 80% and higher), but today was deemed by the boss to be too humid to open the garage doors to allow for a little x-ventilation in the shop. Does this theory hold water?
JP
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Well that humidity sounds a bit dry compared to Houston. I seriously doubt that closing the doors changes anything unless you are relative air tight and use an air-conditioned to remove the humidity.
The humidity does not pose a problem unless you have humid air coming in contact with cold iron.
I don't have a rust problem and my tools are exposed to 90-95% humidity more often than I can keep up with.

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On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 01:07:11 GMT, "Leon"

Actually, his reasoning was that the humidity would cause too much of a change in the moisture content of the wood or something to that effect. In light of the fact that the garage doors are opened and closed at least a few times a day anyhow, I was a bit skeptical of his rationale. Oh well - at least I now know for when I own my own shop.
Thanks all.
JP

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Jay, Now that you've posted this questioning the boss' authoritah you need not come to work Monday. Signed your boss, Cartman.
BTW, you might wanna examine the relationship of your boss' office and the spray booth and/or the finishing supplies locker. Me thinks some fumes are leaking out.
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Jay Pique wrote:

It sounds to me to be like closing the barn doors after the horse escaped. Perhaps you should suggest climate control to the boss if he/she is concerned.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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No.

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Yes, if the temperature inside the closed space is higher than the outdoors.
Makes it tougher to work, though. Sweat drops on cast iron rust quickly

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Jay Pique wrote:

Warm humid air touching cold cast iron loses its moisture through condensation. Open the doors. Set up a fan to blow air though the shop. Leave it running 24/7 through humid days.
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Instant rust?
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"Father Haskell" wrote...

I'm in S. Jersey and it has been very humid here. While the thinking of some seems to be overly dominated by concerns of rust, I can say that in my shop the last couple days, keeping the doors closed has made working more comfortable. My shop is insulated but not cooled and provided I have a fan running and enter quickly through the man door, I seem to be able to keep some of the humidity outside making it more pleasant to work. Even with the fan running, once the doors are opened, even the overhead ones, the shop gets hotter and more humid. On the other hand, the effect only works until about 2 in the afternoon. The shop roof is shielded from the sun by the adjoining structure but by 2 p.m. the sun is beating down on the roof taking away my advantage. Then you have to open the doors regardless - or take a siesta.
It ain't scientific but that's the way it works in my shop. YMMV
--
Cheers,
Howard
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