Close call

For the first time in 20 years of using a table saw, I got nailed by the kickback genie. I was trimming 4 short (5"x5") boards for a project, taking 3/4" off one of the sides. I trimmed the first three against the rip fence without a problem. When I use the TS, I never stand directly in front of the blade. On this cut, I was on the right side of the blade, feeding the work by hand. On cut number 4,I must have turned the board a fraction and the blade kicked that sucker back on an angle and it caught me right in the heart. Scared the crap out of me. On reflection, I shoulda used my featherboard and a push stick. Lesson learned.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/30/2011 7:49 PM, Z3Driver wrote:

Bad call...
W/L >= 1 w/ small pieces is recipe for causing what happened.
Use a sled instead.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Featherboard, holddown piece, and pushstick.
Congrats on your luck.
-- The problem with borrowing money from China is that thirty minutes later, you feel broke again. --Steve Bridges as Obama
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/30/2011 7:49 PM, Z3Driver wrote:

No splitter?
Still, a warning shot is good thing.
(And 5" violates my rule regarding proximity of body parts as a push stick).
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You used a coupon........and you get only so many....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/30/2011 7:49 PM, Z3Driver wrote:

Glad to hear that you were not badly hurt. And as a reminder that standing anywhere behind the blade is in the danger zone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Standing anywhere behind the **wood**. I would love to see you stand in front of the blade.
--------------- "Leon" wrote in message
Glad to hear that you were not badly hurt. And as a reminder that standing anywhere behind the blade is in the danger zone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Z3Driver" wrote
by the kickback genie. I was trimming 4 short (5"x5") boards for a project, taking 3/4" off one of the sides. I trimmed the first three against the rip fence without a problem. When I use the TS, I never stand directly in front of the blade. On this cut, I was on the right side of the blade, feeding the work by hand. On cut number 4,I must have turned the board a fraction and the blade kicked that sucker back on an angle and it caught me right in the heart. Scared the crap out of me.
I have a rule for avoiding this type of problem, that I teach my students... Might be good for you, too.
With the blade set at the right minimum height, measure the distance along the blade that is above the table. Let's say 5 inches is what that measures. I say that the board being cut has to be the length of the blade plus half of that distance added back on, so 5 plus 1/2 (2.5), so the wood needs to be 7.5 inches long, against the fence. The fence also must not be set much further from the blade than the length of the board.
Use the miter gauge if it does not fit the above conditions, and of course, never use the rip fence and the miter gauge at the same time.
-- Jim in NC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Teach your students to make and use a crosscut sled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Teach your students to make and use a crosscut sled.

I do, when there is a need. With two power miter saws and a 14"RAS sitting around, there is not often a need.
-- Jim in NC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jim in NC,
I don't quite get the "The fence also must not be set much further from the blade than the length of the board." Assume you are ripping a 2X4 that is a foot long. The fence distance could not possibly be even close to the length of the board. If you are cross cutting, setting the fence at the board length would mean the board misses the blade.
Where did I get it wrong and what is the correct interpretation?
TIA.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/1/2011 12:06 PM, Baron wrote:

If you are cross cutting, setting the fence at the

You would Not cross-cut a twobyfour using a fence--at least not during the cut. Someone else may be better able to describe your options.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right. The fence cannot be (usefully) set further from the blade than the length of the board, so you're OK. If you're cross-cutting, don't use the fence! Use a cross-cut sled, as has been said here a number of times.

The problem arises when the board twists when it's in contact with the blade. It's a sure way to have it come rocketing back at you. If the board isn't longer than the distance from the blade to the fence, there isn't enough of it on the fence to keep it against the fence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim in NC,
I don't quite get the "The fence also must not be set much further from the blade than the length of the board." Assume you are ripping a 2X4 that is a foot long. The fence distance could not possibly be even close to the length of the board. If you are cross cutting, setting the fence at the board length would mean the board misses the blade.
Where did I get it wrong and what is the correct interpretation?
TIA.

I will try again.
If the saw blade is out of the table top 6" along the direction of travel, the wood being _ripped_ should be at least 9" long. Doing this keeps enough wood on the rip fence to keep it from turning sideways while it is beside the blade, which of course would cause a big kickback.
The second part of the rule is that if the piece being ripped is 9" long, it should not be ripped more than 9" wide. Doing so would allow the wood to again turn sideways, causing kickback.
I know, there are some exceptions for the experienced woodworker, but this rule is to keep 14 to 18 year olds from doing something drastic-bad. They can learn to ignore my rules after I am not responsible for keeping their fingers on their hands.
That work for you? ;-)
-- Jim in NC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks. Now I understand. I initially thought you were using the fence during ripping. I now understand that it simply serves as a reminder to not allow too wide of a rip, crosscut sleds not withsatnding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The smaller the pieces you're cutting, the greater the danger. I cut a small piece of 1/4" luan plywood a few years back and the cutoff hitched a ride over the top of the sawblade, and crossed from right to left side until middle and index fingers of my left hand stopped it (I'm right- handed). I needed a bit of plastic surgery to repair a tendon. Not quite as good as new now, but serviceable. Just didn't like the whole experience.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.