circuit breaker requirement

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Note that this does NOT apply in the case being discussed, because the motor is cord-and-plug connected, not hard-wired -- and thus it IS a Code violation.

A possibly dangerous assumption. I'm sure the writers of the NEC must have had a reason for requiring 30A overcurrent protection on #10 wire.

As noted above, the exception does not apply to this situation.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

motor
violation.
had
Probably a good reason why they allow a 40A breaker on a dedicated circuit also. Both rules come from the same organization so I don't see how you can proclaim one of them to be "a possibly dangerous assumption".

With the obvious exception that now aware of what code says about a hardwired motor, the OP just may want to consider that as an option. Can't see where it hurt to have made him aware of that. At least Donkeyhody made it plainly clear that what he posted was an alternate consideration and that the OP should verify it on his own.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Doug Miller wrote:

Uh, Sorry Doug. While the 3 HP Unisaw comes with a plug and cord, the 5 HP does NOT. Delta said they left off the cord because they expect the 5 HP to be hard wired. He always had the option of taking the cord off and hard wiring the saw in any case.

I won't try to change your opinion about the merits of using a 40 amp breaker on #10 wire. Just check out the NEC, Section 430, Part D - Motor Banch-Circuit Short-Circuit and Ground-Fault Protection. Paragraph 430-52. The paragraph is specifically written to allow larger breakers for motors that draw high amps at startup.
All I ask is that you look it up before you shoot it down.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
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Aaah. I was unaware of that. In that case... it's Code-compliant.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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David wrote:

2P-40A
> Also I am planning basement shop and

Get a 12/24, 125 MLO panel, then install a 2P-60A main.
Basic sub panel for this application.
Lew
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2005 02:57:56 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Thanks for the input everyone. At least I have a starting point. I think I will talk to the inspector first to see how he wants things done. I am sure the right way to do it is to get the permits for the job anyway..
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Hopefully your municipality/State is a little more time friendly with their permits than mine is. I opted to do the work myself. To do that, I had to pass a "test" that covered the NEC and the State Adendums to the NEC. Unfortunately, they wouldn't give any sort of study guide or info about what type of questions would be asked. Considering the NEC book is something like 1000 pages, I figured it might take me a while to deciper it all! If you failed the test, you had to wait at least a month to take it again. The other option, and one I highly recommend if you're not electrical saavy, is to hire it out. It'll cost you a bit (electrician's seems to charge more than most trades....I guess it's cause they gotta learn 1000 pages of stuff...haha) but in the end you'll have a permitted install and you didn't put yourself at risk. I went ahead and did it myself given the complexity of what I wanted done and I found everytime I opened my NEC manual, there was something else that applied to me (% fill of boxes, hanger spacing, etc...). It took a while but I'm convinced it's code compliant and I actually did pick up quite a few learnings in the process. Cheers, cc
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jetman wrote:

If you didn't recognize the short hand of my last post, let me suggest something.
Find an electrician who wants to pick up some extra money on the week end and work out a deal.
You be his grunt.
You dig the trenches, you lay the conduit, you pull the wire, etc, etc, following the electrican's directions.
He makes all the final connections, pulls the permits, etc.
It's a win/win deal.
Lew
He comes in
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wrote:

Run out and buy yourself a copy of "Wiring a House" by Rex Cauldwell. It's a great book, easy to understand, with lots of good pictures and good technique. ISBN is 1-56158-113-5.
Cheers!
Steve
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Ditto on Rex's book. It is very clear, well written and has significant substantive detail explaining how, and more importantly, why things are done a certain way. I wired two shops from scratch using it.
Mutt
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wrote:

May I strongly recommend the book "Advanced Home Wiring" from Black and Decker? It is the only home wiring book I've found so far that has actuall usefull layout information and which can tell you what gauges of wire are appropriate for your situation. It doesn't cover quite everything you need to know, but darn close.
I'm not sure what you are thinking as far as asking about breaker sizes, but if you have a 30 amp breaker now, and install a 40, but don't upgrade the wiring, you are risking some pretty hot and melty wires.
I don't know if the insurance company thing is fact or myth, but then, would YOU like to be the test case? Get a pro in there and have it done right. Ask around, you probably know someone who knows someone.
Mark
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