Chisels broke

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I bought four sets of chisels from a used place. The kind with a light green see-thru handle and a black trim - no brand. It performed fine for a few weeks until a pearl sized chip came off in sections from the tip of the green handle which I did not notice earlier. I was chiseling against the grain of the wood, not along the grain as instructed from a book. But, I've chiseled against the grain with a 10-year old Stanley (with a non-see-thru plastic handle) without problems.
The problem is that a few of the green see-thru chisels have 10-15 percent chips gone from its plastic striking surface. Since that day I am more careful. I'm not sure whether the cause is the a 12-oz. iron hammer or the way I pound them. What's the best way to repair these tool?
Thanks
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Toss them and buy a good set. Hone them before use.
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There are two problems: 1) You bought cheap, low-quality chisels. 2) You should be using a wooden or urethane mallet, not an iron hammer, on a plastic striking surface.
The best way to "repair" them is to throw them out, buy better chisels, and treat the new ones properly.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Buy good chisels & use a wooden mallet. I turned a chunk of Red Oak firewood into a mallet that is perfect in about 10 minutes. My chisels are used, but they are a nice set of swedish ones that were passed down. I keep a couple of small sets of Stanley & other cheap ones for beater projects. You can't do decent woodworking without a good set of chisels that are just for good work - in my opinion, anyway. - Jim
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Sat, Mar 5, 2005, 7:18am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Jim) says: Buy good chisels & use a wooden mallet. I turned a chunk of Red Oak firewood into a mallet that is perfect in about 10 minutes. <snip>
He was probably whacking them way too hard too. I've got 7 mallets, different sizes, weights, types of wood, 6 if you don't include the pine one the dog chewed on. The lighter ones work great for more delicate chiseling, the big heavy ones are for whacking the Hell out of them.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 15:45:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

You never "whack the Hell" out of chisels. (i) you sharpen them, and (ii) the fact that the mallet is heavier should do ...Like my dear old daddy used to tell me, rest his soul, "Let the tool do the work."
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Sat, Mar 5, 2005, 5:10pm snipped-for-privacy@here.com (Guesswho) erroneously claims: You never "whack the Hell" out of chisels. <snip>
LMAO Maybe in your world. My chisels "are" sharp, by the way. When I want delicate cuts, I use a light mallet, and tap, tap, tap, letting "the tool do the work".
However, in my world, on those times when I need (or want) to take a big chunk at one go, I use my biggest chisel, take my biggest, heaviest, mallet, and "whack the Hell out of it". Works quite well. Fun too. When my woodworking stops being fun, I'll stop woodworking.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

My heaviest wooden mallet is around 18lbs.... 8-)
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Sun, Mar 6, 2005, 12:35am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) says: My heaviest wooden mallet is around 18lbs.... 8-)
That definitely makes it a two-man job. OK, you hold the chisel, and I'll swing the mallet. Trust me.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

One man, _definitely_. No one even wants to stand near it when it's being swung. It's a timber-framing "commander" for putting big joints together.
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I have a well-beaten rawhide mallet that came with a box of old tools I bought in an auction. This ugly mallet became my favorite mallet--just the right size, weight, and non-marring. For heavier stuff, I have a dead-blow shot-filled mallet. Most often I just use hand pressure with a chisel--if that doesn't work chances are it's time to do some sharpening.
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Jim wrote:

Funny how some of us hunt the wood pile for turning wood!
Martin
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Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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Martin, you aren't kidding. I stopped by the saw mill & bought $102 worth of wood yesterday. I don't do it too often & the pile this time was depressingly small. Locally, we get nice cherry, oak, poplar & maple. Got a couple of boards of each just to put in the shop & let it sit for when I need it.
Lately, I've mostly been turning green wood - found wood. I like that price a LOT better. <G> We have some neat local woods that never make the sawmill; osage orange, dogwood, beech & sycamore. There are also some neat exotics like the japanese sampora that a woman had cut out of her back yard last year. I'm starting to cut a few of my own boards. I don't really have the room for even a portable sawmill & drying shed, so I doubt I'll get into it too much, but besides being a lot of fun, working with these other woods is very interesting. Also keeps my wallet from hiding in a dark corner & whining. <G>
Jim
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Laburnum is one of the nicest decorative trees for turning :) It has a very dark center and a yellow outer layer. Wonderful close grained wood but hard to find. Some of my best looking pieces came from the nastiest looking scraps :) Amazing how the coloring in the grain changes from being wet and dried multiple times under various types of junk. Madrone and manzanita root can be very interesting too.

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wrote:

Have you ever seen "oyster veneering" - an 18th century decorative technique ? Diagonal slices of laburnum are trimmed rectangular and placed together as a decorative veneer. It's plug-ugly IMHO, but certainly an interesting and impressive technique.
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Glenn wrote:

As I pack, I have a spindle with ends still attached of Osage Orange curing in my bottom dresser drawer. Been there 8 years and I think it might be dryish. It has a beautiful color now, and will be turned a bit to true up internal stretches.
Speaking of the magical Madrone - I have some that are 100' or more high but are likely 150' in length! - One is larger than my belt size at 100' and is horizontal! The trunks twist and turn. The color of the wood is so fine and the wood tight.
I have two limbs well seasoned for future projects. Larger bowls never made it as the wood comes alive during turning as the stress grain is cut and a twist comes undone! Now try to cut that with a hand skew! Exciting times.
In my new shop, I'll get the wood lathe out and have plenty of room. Hope to get my skill, my Uncle - Uncle Dave - he is making Hats! - Yes western, and others! The pictures are something else. I get one this summer. Can't wait to walk into a lumber yard or wood working store of some sort with a wood hat!
Martin
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@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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Sun, Mar 6, 2005, 4:19am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Jim) says: <snip> We have some neat local woods that never make the sawmill; osage orange, dogwood, beech & sycamore. <snip>
Yup, I decided quite some time back that it was more satisfying to work with just wood native to North Carolina. Or, free wood. Free wood is popular wood. Pallets are free, and can have some nice wood - oir not - "free" is the operational word. I'm not sure where pallets grow. but I know they're native. Anymore, the only wood I buy sometimes is plywood. I buy it becuse I know plywood trees are native here too.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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With this type of chisel I like to use a wooden mallet.
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Whatever type of chisel you use, be sure to whack it with a back and froe motion.
Bob Swinney

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Nick Huckaby wrote:

light green

few
the green

grain of the

chiseled against

handle) without

percent
more careful.

I pound

Chisels with plastic handles are not made for beating on with a hammer. For hammering they should have a metal core that extends to the striking surface. You should never use a steel hammer on any wood chisel. Beechwood, rawhide or nylon mallets are made to drive chisels. Save the steel hammer for driving cold chisels. Bugs
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