Cherry problem

I've got lots of cherry (maybe 500 board feet or more) rough cut 1" and 2" thick that I've had for 11 years. I got it from the original owner after he died. It was cut maybe 25 years ago. It was properly stored with stickers through every layer and the ends were sealed. It has always been stored inside (unheated).
My problem is that whenever I use a piece, it warps after being surfaced. A 10" board might have as much as a 1/4" - 3/8" crown a few days after being surfaced.
I've tried surfacing one side and waiting but no luck. I've heard of case hardening. Is there any solution?
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Ship it to me, I'll see what I can do.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Unless, by the term "crown", you mean "cup". If it's cupping cross-grain, you may have to rip to smaller widths, mill, and then edge-glue them back together. If it's along the grain, try rough-milling, allow it to move as long as possible, preferably in its intended environment, then mill down to final specs. HTH Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

No there isn't. You need to take a deep breath and disassociate yourself from that pile of rubbish. I'll send a truck right away to help you with that process.
It sounds like it will only be good enough for flooring...and who on earth would want a cherry floor? Cherry floors have been known to turn that ugly colour.
Your address please?
r------> who truly hopes you can salvage that pile, it is my #1 favourite wood.
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Do you let it acclimate to your workshop before prepping it? If not, try that.
Last year I bought some oak that the guys father had put up 50 years ago. No problems with that at all, except that half of it is insect damaged. Don't know if it is a matter of luck or the species.
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Is it stickered now, or close-stacked? If close-stacked, it's entirely possible that you have the down side several percent above the up in moisture.
Good practice would be to select your boards, sticker and acclimate for a week or so _where they will be milled_, and then begin working.
Ability to use wide boards is nice. Current project had a need for some boards wider than my jointer - easy to do - and all I had in cherry was some I had purchased years ago. #1 common for $250/MBF, and loaded with twists and knots. I spent a day with my scrub and jack getting a flat face to plane to on some 16 pcs. Hard work for an old fart, I can tell you.
Fortunately this wood had been stored indoors in the same conditions as I was going to be working it, so once flat, it stayed there.
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I have had the same problem with some 8/4 birch. However, when I surfaced both sides equally it was OK. Make sure you flip the board each time that it goes through the planer.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Thanks for the warning. I love cherry and have been meaning to make something in it. The timber seems to have a reputation for being easy to work, but your post seems to indicate that it can be 'tetchy'.
As my workshop is a damp garage, I usually rough cut all my project components and then bring them into the house for the central heating to dry out before I start the serious work. Where I have tried to short cut this I've generally has shrinkage and the problem of joints parting.
Have you tried rip cutting and re-jointing with the grain alternately reversed? The problem with this is - if you've not tried it - is that it takes bloody ages and you can lose a lot of material trying to joint perfectly square and then squaring the resultant component (although I must be pretty cack-handed I admit).
I hope that this is useful.
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