Change color of stain on stairs

Hello All;
We've been renovating our home, and have come across an unforseen and unexpected problem ( for us ) with the wood floors and stairs. Our stairs, were built new, and out of red oak, our hardwood floor (chosen after stairs were ordered and installed) is quarter sawn white oak (unfinished). The problem is with the stain. We took a sample of the floor to the paint store where they custom blended a stain to our liking. It looks great on the flooring, however, it looks horrible on the stairs. The stain has a tinge of red in it and the red oak really makes the stain come "alive". We take full reponsability for this error as we did not mention the different woods when getting the stain, nor did we think much of it until the painter brought it to our attention, after staining the stairs...
The problem is that the painter has stained the stairs, and they look, well, red, too red.. Is there any way to make them look not so red. Would it all have to be sanded off?. I have called in the floor guy for advice, on this matter, and was just looking for other opininons to compare notes when we meet
Thanx in advance
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Nel wrote:

http://www.woodzone.com/articles/wood_bleach.htm
--
Bill


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A greenish color will move the color away from red toward brown. If the painter can apply a thin coat of finish tinted with a green dye that would help.

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On 20 May 2004 04:44:08 -0700, manny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Nel) wrote:

--- WARNING! Try this on scrap before your floor! --
You've been warned!
You could try a tinted clear coat., say with some green or blue colorant added to tone down the red.
I've used universal colorants in shellac, lacquer and even polyurethane to change stained wood after the fact with good success. Take good notes while you test, add color to the clear SLOWLY, and you'd be surprised what you can do.
Barry
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On 20 May 2004 04:44:08 -0700, manny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Nel) wrote:

If you have not clear-coated the stairs, then you can stain over them with a dilute version of the same stain type - but in a greenish hue.
The green will neutralize the red and the result will be more in the brown range. The danger here is that you may darken the material more than you wish, so proceed carefully. Do this incrementally, on an area like the underside of a tread bullnose, or on a scrap piece of stair wood, treated in the same way as the original, in order to test the result.
If you have clear-coated the steps, you can buy a dye stain like TransTint that can be added to your clear-coat, and it will give much the same result.
As in the above, testing on scrap, or a little viewed area is very important before doing the whole job.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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On 20 May 2004 04:44:08 -0700, manny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Nel) brought forth from the murky depths:

Get some scraps of red oak and try your stain on it. Then try an overcoat of green dye (oil-based for oil, water/alcohol-based dye for waterborne finishes) to reduce the red. Good luck. :-0
I prefer wood-colored wood, myself.
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