Building insulation question

We have finally found an old warehouse type building to move into. The usual flat roof (good condition, light insulation) and concrete block construction. What is going to be the best way (heavy consideration on the cost, present and future)to make it somewhat energy effecient. About 60% of the second floor ceiling is batted. The rest is not but does have a suspended ceiling. I'm mainly concerned about the outside walls. Do we stud, insulate and sheetrock the inside or eps and "drive-it" the outside? Or is there a better way? The building is two story, 5k per floor. Help! By the way, we're in Oklahoma, so the summer sun is a definite consideration. Respectfully, Ron Moore
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    Thanks for the correction on the Dryvit. I was wondering where the thermal mass would do the most good. I've thought about the radiant barrier "paint" coating also, maybe that on the outside and then insulate the inside. We're wanting to do an industrial type loft so wall shelving isn't necessary. I suppose a deal on some sip panel might work as well. We would like to retain some of the block wall texture but maybe that on the south wall for efficiency.     Do you know anything about the radiant barrier material? I hadn't thought about the stud center placement but that is a great idea. I wonder if using 6" studs (and more insulation) would add that much to the efficency and would metal studs be that much less effecient than wood? BTW, thanks for the response. Respectfully, Ron Moore
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Ron Moore wrote:

The studs are a significant thermal leakage path through the insulation, one more reason to got to 24 OC.
Metal studs are significantly worse thermal leaks than wood studs. I don't have the numbers handy but you can probably find them with the help of Google.
Rico
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Ron,
Look into foam filling the block wall. It will solve air infiltration, sound, heat and cold problems. There are several contractors in Oklahoma City. http://www.thecityofoklahomacity.com/insulation /
http://www.usainsulation.com/States/oklahoma.htm
DIY ? http://www.fomofoam.com/Fire-Foam1.html
We have been doing this on new Putnam City Schools.
Your best money will be spent on ceiling insulation, door and window caulking/sealing, maintaining the HVAC equipment.
Where in town are you?
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Dan, Thanks for the response. We have a contract on 4900 N Sewell in OKC. Thats just east of Broadway and just south of NW 50th. We close on Jan 29th or before, hopefully. I guess we'll be almost right behind Ellis Construction referred to in your links. I don't know if there will be access to the ccblock wall for filling. Why does foam filling effect the R value when the concrete has such a low value (1.1 /in)? Are you with one of the local companies? We would like to put a much better roof on the building but from a cost standpoint we will probably live with the existing for a while and finish insulating the ceiling inside. So many options, it's hard to knoww where to go first. Thanks again. Respectfully, Ron Moore
DanG wrote:

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Filling the cores is often done with new construction. You can buy inserts that go into the blocks, or, after construction bead can be blown into the cores. They both work, but not as good as full insulation. Products like Poly Core and Korfil can only be used in new construction before the block is laid. Loose filling can be done as long as there is access to the top course openings. It will not fill voids under windows unless done in new construction before the window is placed. In either case, the mortar lines and webs are still poor insulators. Ed
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No, no connection with local contractor. I work for Putnam City Schools, facility management.
The foam work we have had done was through the masonry contractor on new work, so I have no direct recommendation. When we have had the foam fill work, the contractors elected to drill multiple holes above and below bond beams to inject the foam. Block work typically has a horizontal and vertical concrete filled block every 4 feet each way. The holes were quite small. I think it would work quite well for existing especially if it easy to get to the walls, though we have not done so. We tend to spend our dollars on window, roof, and equipment upgrades.
EIFS (Dryvit) provides an excellent method to upgrade the exterior look and insulation factor of the building. Bruce Moss at Moss plastering or H&W plastering would be good ones.
We tend to stay with modified bitumen roofing over foam board insulation on the roofs. Southwest Roofing, perhaps the largest in the state, will be one of your new neighbors (they face Sante Fe) If you want a smaller, service oriented, contractor call Larry Hedinger at G&L Roofing. We are looking at foam roof possibilities, a young man in that business is Keith Durham, H&H roofing, 417-5463, if you want to look into it.
What type of facility are you creating? I don't imagine there is any relationship with Ron Moore glass company in Edmond. If I can be of assistance, send me a personal email.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Look into 2x6 studs and insulation. You might even put up 2 layers of 5/8 sheetrock. I would think you could get almost R30 out of that combo, maybe r 24?

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