Blowing sawdust around

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Amazon brought this to my attention:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)Ξnter-2&pf_rd_rVN2MB3MHFSK2ARCSFQ&pf_rd_t1&pf_rd_pG0938631&pf_rd_iP7846
Metro Vacuum ED500 DataVa 500-Watt, .75 HP Electric Duster (actually a blower).
I know you're supposed to blow the dust off of equiptment and out of motors every once in a while. Do you folks who do this use dedicated compressors? This seems like it could perform dual duty (In the computer room and the workshop), is exceptionally portable and doesn't take up as much space. What do you think?
Bill
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)Ξnter-2&pf_rd_rVN2MB3MHFSK2ARCSFQ&pf_rd_t1&pf_rd_pG0938631&pf_rd_iP7846
E V E nutally you buy tools and equipment with TEFC motors, No blowing needed.
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I think the real "problem" here is that I have been reading old books. Thanks for helping to bring me up-to-date!
Bill
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On 2/12/2010 10:38 PM, Leon wrote:

I would think that there should be a word of caution about the fan system being discussed. Wood dust will explode, when it reaches the proper concentrations. With the fan to create a uniform mixture of wood dust and air through out the garage, you will get a bigger explosion, when your furnace, or other system creates the spark.
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I believe that is highly unlikely. The only time you hear of that actually being a problem is through what a freind heard a frend read some where. What you will need is a fire to burn the dust, but probably no explosion.
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wrote in message

You've probably got a better chance of finishing materials catching on fire than sawdust building up and exploding. On Mythbusters, there was one episode where they built this giant fireball machine. It used powered material like sawdust (or coffee creamer), hooked to a large compressed air tank and with some sort of fusee in the middle.
My guess is that by the time saw dust concentration was high enough in the shop, you'd be choking or blinded by it first.
Puckdropper
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On 2/13/2010 10:35 AM, Leon wrote:

I did not believe that spontaneous combustion was a problem either until our house nearly caught fire from the spontaneous combustion of the sanding dust from our hardwood floors. Fortunately we caught it at the big smoke stage and was able to get it out of the garage.
The flammable limit of the dust from a table saw is minor because of the larger particle size of the dust. However the dust from a sanding operation has significantly smaller particles sizes. As you finish the item you are sanding with decreasing grit sizes, you will also be decreasing the particle size of dust. As the particle size of the dust reaches the particle size of flour, there will be a high possibility of an explosion.
or as the particles size decreases the flammability and explosion possibility increase.
Lower flammable limit: 40 mg/m3 Auto-ignition temperature: 400-500oF
http://www.jgflooring.com/JG_MSDS.pdf
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On 2/13/10 11:39 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

What is the big smoke stage.

The source you provided reads "40 grams (40,000 mg) of dust per cubic meter," not 40milligrams.
40grams/m3 is a lot and would certainly effect your vision enough that you would hardly be able to see what you were sanding, no?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 2/13/2010 12:55 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

That is interesting as I checked several other MSDS sheets and copied from this one.
http://www.qmaxsolutions.com/Files/ContentVersionFile/47105/sawdust.pdf
If you are a good liability lawyer you may have a potential client.
I went back and rechecked the other Online MSDS's and they list 40g/cubic meter.
All that said I still would not want to have a VERY fine wood dust distributed around my shop with a fan, knowing the potential of dust explosions.
http://www.sbcindustry.com/docs/OQM/0808_Chicago/management/EXHIBIT_5_Sawdust_Combustion.pdf
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That may be a case of a typo getting reproduced. Known to happen... *especially* in the internet age.

http://www.sbcindustry.com/docs/OQM/0808_Chicago/management/EXHIBIT_5_Sawdust_Combustion.pdf
I'm not doubting it can happen, and obviously has. Farmers have known about it for years. I'm just saying, the home shop guy isn't going to let it get that bad. I could see a sugar factory with everyone wearing full head breathers, all focused on close-up work they are doing, not seeing the haze around them.
Nonetheless, better safe than sorry.
BTW, what is the big smoke stage?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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A DRUMMER ... has to ask this question?? ;-)
Just picked up a used JDS 10-16 air filtration unit, today. With a bit of luck, I'll have nothing to say on the matter :-)
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On 2/13/2010 7:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Just before it breaks into open flames.
Since we were moving in to a new house the garage was full of cardboard boxes. The sanding dust was in a plastic bag in a plastic garbage can that was sitting next to the cardboard boxes.
When the garage filled up with smoke and it started leaking into the house we realized that something was wrong. Fortunately I was able to get the garage open and the can into the drive. At that point it was simple to fill the can with water.
It took some time to get the smell of smoke out of the garage, and the plastic can had to be replaced as a big section was melted from the heat.
It was one of those comedy of errors things. No one did anything wrong, just the sum of the actions of several people created the quite volatile situation.
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Out of curiosity, had the dust come from newly finished wood or was it just the wood itself that heated?
--
Nonny

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On Sat, 13 Feb 2010 20:18:44 -0500, Keith Nuttle

Well, this has absolutely nothing to do with the flammability of dust in suspension in the air. This is about sanding an oil-finished floor that has not fully cured and the heating that comes from the curing process - or - about slightly wet sawdust being packed into a closed container - or - about a spark from some other source getting included in the sweeping up - I've seen sparks from tools and cigarettes both end up starting fires that way (good thing to watch out for on your dust collector as well. A cig sucked into the collection bag can ruin your whole day).
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Yeah
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

I know that finishing materials - oils - can catch fire spontaneously due to the heat generated by the oxidation as the stuff dries. Never heard of wood dust doing so though; what was causing all the oxidation?
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dadiOH
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On 2/13/10 7:41 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Think corn silo. The concentration of dust would have to be so high that you would not be able to see across your shop, let alone breathe. I don't know about you, but I would probably do something about the dust loooong before it reached that point.
--

-MIKE-

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You should also be careful not to use plastic pipe for the ducts on your DC as they generate enough static electricity to power all the New England states for a week. Don't forget that compressor tanks can explode and take your entire neighborhood down and the flying debris can put the eyes out of everyone for miles around. You could also hurt your back in the cleanup process too. Maybe it would be better if you just stayed in bed. ;~) Art
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september.org:

What about bed sores?
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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Artemus wrote:

I guess you never saw a close up of those damned dust mites that live in your bed:
http://www.dust-mites.org /
You 'might' be able to blow them out with a good compressor. 'Might' be best to just go kill ourselves and be done with it...
--
Jack
Obama Care...Freedom not Included!
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