Bigger bandsaw choices, what to do, what to do! (long)

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spake:<Snipped>

Max use of lumber, minimum waste of good cherry (or what have you). Tom
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 15:06:17 -0500, the inscrutable "Thomas Bunetta"

How much of this are you planning on doing? Enough to justify the nearly $4k that Minimax wants for the 24", or about $2.5k for the little M16? (I had trouble wrestling a pair of crowbars to get $695 out of my wallet for the G1012. ;)
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<snip>

believe in the "buy once, cry once" line of thinking. I'm looking at the 20 inch saw, not the 24" (that was the Grizzly (note: no E). It's just money, but the resale value of better tools seems to hold up reasonably well and should serve my present and anticipated needs for quite some time to come. My little Jet 14" has frustrated me on numerous occasions with its limited capacity... A couple of weeks ago I was slicing a log of spalted pecan, and had to waste more that I'd like due to the under 6" limit. One day I'll want a lathe, and cutting bowl blanks or larger chunks of crotch or burl will now be possible. Tom
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On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 05:30:49 -0500, the inscrutable "Thomas Bunetta"
<snip>

People used to buy entire homes for the price of a Minimax nowadays. Maybe I'm just too frugal. I still have a whole lot of trouble with those pesky commas in prices. =:-0

Nice new trick, old dog. ;) (Kudos.)

Resale value? Most tools made today will outlast us (given minor maintenance) if only semi-well made.

Yeah, a 14-incher isn't meant to resaw. The G1012 can handle 10", and that's decent enough for me.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

and out perform any car or any truck, especially if you don't take it out on the road a lot. ;)
Josie
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Thanks Larry, I had already read that one (and the Laguna forum had a stinging counterpoint reply to the article). That and other posts there had convinced me they were not the kind of people I like to associate with. Tom
<snip>> Interesting article for ya:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/readarticle.pl?dir=reviews&file=articles_206.shtml
<snip>
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I am shopping for an 18" bandsaw. In the meantime I am using the service of a portable bandsaw mill contractor His hourly fee is $45.00 CAD. The last time we downed some eastern pine trees. We then cut them in 12 foot lengths and saw them to 4/4 and 8/4 thick. The largest widths I had was 24-26 inches. On average I had 12" -14" wide boards. Now I am making arrangement to get some oak, ash, yellow birch and cherry logs. Maybe not all at once. Then when I am ready I'll call the portable mill contractor and hire him to cut the proper bowl blanks sizes from 8 feet long logs. What will be left for me to do is to cross cut the blanks as per the correct lengths. If this goes well I'll have decide if I need an 18" bandsaw. Once the rough bland have a flat surface that could rest of the cast iron table of the bandsaw I may only need a 16 inches to cut them in circle.?

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This is about the best "drive by" I've seen in a while. In SW Florida there isn't as much availability for log hunting... but every now and then I get a few smaller interesting pieces. For now I will see the greatest use in slicing panels, rather than planing it away. Tom

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Where I live its could costs less money to buy fire wood in 8 feet lengths and have it delivered to your backyard. By doing that you cannot be picky and choosy. You can get everything from yellow birch, maple, ash, oak, cherry, walnut and others. Last year I got some cherry and walnut. This year I only have maple and yellow birch. Before christmas I have sent for a Laguna catalogue and I am still waiting for it. Although my mentors tell me to go for the 24" bandsaw or stay with what I now have, the BusyBee 16" Bandsaw looks attractive to me. As for the slicing panels I am doing fine with the portable saw mill contractor. What I have learned is that air drying keeps the board pretty flat and I can get away with a thickness of 7/8 instead of 1". This way have less surface planing to do.

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On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 23:19:31 -0500, "Thomas Bunetta"

combination of residential/urban areas and big winds.
That's the way it works around here, anyway.
--RC "Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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If you want pine or oak, yes. I have gotten some lace wood (silk oak) as well. I have never seen cherry or more than a few maple trees though. Tom
<snip>> I'd think there'd be a lot of opportunity for log hunting -- A

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On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 06:32:28 -0500, "Thomas Bunetta"

such. Mesquite is particularly common since people plant them in beds and such. They don't realize that unlike trees from civilized parts the native trees around here have root systems that extend out to two or three times the diameter of their drip lines. The mesquite is constricted by the concrete and that leave it with a root system that can't hold it again high wind.
Of course resawing ironwood is a pain (!) but the stuff is beautiful.
--RC "Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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If you want pine or oak, yes. I have gotten some lace wood (silk oak) as well. I have never seen cherry or more than a few maple trees though. Tom
<snip>> I'd think there'd be a lot of opportunity for log hunting -- A

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<snip>

Mea Culpa... my spiel chucker didn't like "grizzly" <G>

Logs are one thing, but veneers and panels are the primary resaw use.

It does, or stellite... I don't remember which at the moment.

OK, OK I get it <grin>.

<snip>> I didn't order floor delivery but my G1012 came on a liftgate andthe

Both Laguna and Minimax tell me they will "put it on the floor, Griz simply states it's my responsibility to get it off the truck, and suggests a forklift.

Ha! I seldom get out of Englewood! Thanks for your input (and the chiding ;>). Tom
<snip>
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(snip of excellent hammer salesman example)

(snip of good stuff)

Tom: Bandsaw guru Mark Duginske told me face-to-face that my Italian-made Laguna 16LT was a very good saw but that their larger saws are now made in Bulgaria, leading him to question the level of their goodness.He has been quoted in Agazzani's ads, and after meeting him I doubt that he did it just for the money. OTOH, he has a Minimax in his shop (20'?); I know because he demo'ed it for us guys in the class. He also appeared at the last Milwaukee wood show handling the Minimax display. Personally, I don't think you could go wrong with either of the last two saws mentioned, but Minimax would probably have better availability than Agazzani. This is a bit speculative, of course.
Bob

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Also heard that David Marks has ordered (if not already recieved) a MiniMax 36 for HIS shop
I spoke to Duginske at a woodworking show before I bought my MM24, and I asked him point blank, if HE were buying a 24in saw, what would be buy, and he said that of the current offerings he would go with the MiniMax or the Agazzani comparable model
John
wrote:

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By the way, my MM24 is clearly marked Centauro, Italy
John
wrote:

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<my stuff snipped>

Thanks for your comments and time... Wow! a better recommendation can't be found (Mark Duginske). OK, I guess my quest is over. Minimax wins by a length! It'll be a couple of weeks before the money becomes available, then I'll place the order! I'll review and post, of course. I'm also working on a Woodrat review (part one) I'll post soon. Thanks for your insight, and your time. Tom
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