Big Planer Owners

Page 1 of 2  

I have a question about the bigger planers. I am considering the purchase of a new 15" stationary planer. Is there an advantage to the motor being under rather than on top and or the cutter head moving up and down rather than the table. I realize that with a moving table that the in feeds will need always out of whack if used. In particular I am looking at a Jet JWP-15cs with motor on bottom,with the table that moves up and down, closed base with wheels, rollers on top for sliding the work rather than carrying it back for the next pass and the X5 Delta. The Delta 22-780X has the motor on top the cutter head moves and it has long swing down roller in feed and out feed extensions. They look twice as long as the Jet in feed and out feed rollers and no wheels for mobility. So far the Delta looks real nice when considering the long fold down roller extensions.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 23:15:05 GMT, "Leon"

cant answer yet but i just finnished unloading my xmas present. a 20 " powermatic model 209. as soon as SWMBO will let me open it i will let ya know how it does.
skeez
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do you think it will be big enough? LOL Good for you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't recall the model number (380?), Leon, but the 'motor-on-top' Delta has been my work horse planer for over 20 years. The guy who owns the shop now, still works it pretty hard. That 3HP isn't going to waste. I replaced the out-feed roller, a chain, a set of bearings and a hand wheel. Mine did not have the fancy-pants roller tables... that would have been nice.
If I ever find myself looking at production again, I'd do it all over again. (Assuming the quality is still there...and nowadays.. who knows?) I took a job which included 800 sq-ft of cherry floors, and bought a set of carbide knives for it.... I cannot imagine a better finish from a planer.
After that thing, I cannot stand the sound and wind-up of those universal motors you now find in all those lunch-box planers.
That was a tool done right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you sir.

I confess that the last time I was around a large planer was in school. I have been using an original portable, The Ryobi AP -10 since 1988. You mention sound wind up noise on the portables, is the Delta quieter? IIRC the school shop monsters were unmistakable noisy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mine had an induction motor. There's the noise of the air getting churned by the blades.. some gears and chains.. but none of that screamin' demon of the AP-10. I used to have one of those as well. Very handy on a job site. One of the very early ones. It was a great solution for a lot of aspiring woodworkers in those days. I think it pretty much put Ryobi on the map.
Maybe if you took a dB reading on either planer, there may not be a big difference other than 'balls'. The pitch is different.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
addendumdumdadumdum
I also wanted to add something which I tend to think is important. Universal motors on a planer is not the best choice, because they will slow down as you load them up. Induction motors continue at the same speed (up to a point ..an obvious point) and I think feed-rate is an important component whenever you're cutting anything. There are electronic solutions to constant speed in the world of universal motors, but I don't know if any lunch-box-style planers have that much sophistication.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well for sure the planer will be the larger stationary style with the induction motor. Ever since the portables went to disposable blades I have had a bad taste in my mouth about them. My old AP-10 is still using the same original set that I resharpen. I bet the savings of blade replacement and sharpening alone will pay for the difference in price between the 2 planers. Typically new disposable blades run in the 30 to 50 dollar range. Also the 30 fpm rate to get the stock close to thickness has to have its advantages over the 16 and or 20 fpm max portables.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
we have a top of the line planer from woodmaster ($4000) and it has an induction motor, the only thing that will slow it down is a board coming in too fast but it came with a roller control box so your can control the speed of your rollers but the motor will still be at a constant speed

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great, thanks again. I was afraid that the bigger one would be louder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Usually the cheaper planers have a brushed (universal) motor mounted directly onto a moving head. The better ones have a fixed head driven by an induction motor underneath. Industrial ones are similar, but the bed stays fixed and the head moves (this needs a more complex belt tensioner).
An induction motor is quieter and cooler running, giving a longer life. Unless you're really going to hammer it, and your chip collection is already remote and quiet, then you might never notice the difference.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes but the larger 15" Deltas have the induction motor on top. The salesman seemed to believe that the motor on top would wear out the adjustment screws faster than the the one with the motor on bottom. I believe that this may be true but not while I am alive.

Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I'm planing really long material, well, 8 feet or longer actually. I like to have an out-feed support. I don't want to have to adjust it all of the time. I like moving cutter heads and stationary feed tables. Set it all up once and get busy!
.02 from a new guy, Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I feel the same way I always support my work now, manually. However, the Delta that I am looking at has about 6' of support counting the in feed and out feed. I'll be able to let go sooner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been using the ancestor of the top-motor types - RC 33 - for the last twenty five or so at home, and various at shops at my school and others.
I like the motor up top in a small shop. Fewer clearance surprises that way. As to the rollers in and out, they're more trouble than they're worth. People try to use them as handles, which throws them out of line, because they're flimsy as hell. A moment's inattention will trap a hand between the end of an outfeeding board and the roller, which is even worse. The business of rollers up top to "return" a board being planed is plain stupid. If you have two people, you hand the board. If you have one, you walk.
For one-man operation, go top motor. For two, doesn't matter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the particular Delta model that I am looking at, the rollers have steel between them so that there is not a chance of getting a hand trapped and the extensions are quite solid. It is more like a flat table with openings just large enough for the largre rollers to be exposed. Otherwise I totally agree so much that most any other planer I have seen with in and out feed rollers do have large gaps that could lead to a serious injury if one is not paying attention. Take a look here and click to enlarge the picture. http://www.deltamachinery.com/index.asp?e 6&pG47
The business of rollers up top to "return" a board being planed is plain stupid.
The more I think about it the more I agree. It seems like it would be more effort to raise the board up there and push it half way, walk to the other side and grab it again. It actually sounds like more work in the long run. I have been walking the wood around for 15+ years with out any problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll disagree. When planing more than one board to a common thickness, you can stack them on the top rollers (an infeed stack and an outfeed stack) as you plane them down pass after pass.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You mean "balance them," don't you? Asking for trouble. I set up left and right using tablesaw and RAS table, moving from side to side with each pass. They lay easier with a couple-three feet of support, which is why we rolled a table up beside the one at school for the purpose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

How often do you run the same board through the planer at the same depth of cut? It seems like you are saying you take the just-planed board from the outfeed, walk back to the infeed, and feed it through again. If I only have one board, I will move it from outfeed to the rollers on top, leave it there while I adjust the depth, pick it up off the top and run the next pass. I guess I'm wierd or I'm not understanding your method.
-jj
--
Remove BOB to email me

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do 10 to 15 boards at a time, and then walk the last board to the infeed side and start the process over.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.