bevel howto?

What would be the best way to create the bevel under the top for this console?
http://www.greendesigns.com/index.html?store/living/neehi72
I don't own a pneumatic die grinder.
Thanks.
--
Brian
www.garagewoodworks.com
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The bevel looks to me like a combination of a straight bevel and a curve. I would cut the straight bevel first then the curve. For the curve I would make a template, draw the cut line and remove most of the waste with a jigsaw. Then I would stick the template down and trim the curve with router set up with a pattern bit. If you would like to have a sketchup model of a console that looks like the Green Design console the following link will take you to one. http://www.srww.com/blog Earl Creel

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The same question about this same piece of furniture came up a month ago: http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_thread/thread/2590740ffa60d3b6/c32b49a93446d2c9
R
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wrote:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_thread/thread/2590740ffa60d3b6/c32b49a93446d2c9
Excellent! Thank you.
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You're welcome. BTW, my first choice would be a draw knife followed by a drum sander chucked into a drill. You're far less likely to fook things up with less powerful tools.
R
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"RicodJour" wrote:

Make that flap wheels, about 2" dia x 40 grit.
They do a great job, especially if you have a pneumatic drill with a 3/8" chuck.
You probably won't find what you need in stock but they can be special ordered in lots of 6-10.
I used my local hardware store.
BTW, use a fairing batten to find high/low spots.
Lew
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"Best way" is typically one of the simplest. I would try using a pattern bit (bearing on shaft) and simply place a shim / wedge attached to router base with double-sided tape. Attach the shim to the base on the side of the router base that is to remain furthest from and parallel the top's edge.
The thickness of the shim / wedge will tilt the router bit inward and the degree of bevel will be determined by the thickness. I would make a tapered shim but even a flat shim will tilt the router - just be sure you don't rotate the router while following an edge.
If that doesn't work, then I'd probably put the top on my TS and use that. Of course that means I would need a slider so I can bevel the tops ends too....meaning - hell of a justification for a new tool accessory....
If that fails, Lee Valley sells some very nice hand planes that would be perfect for that task.... http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pH944&cat=1,41182
Bob S.
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Think those designs out well, wood movement wise. You can do better than the original.
My BIL has a genuine GD table that *exploded* during New England seasonal changes.
As far as the bevel... It looks to me like a bevel cut with a roundover on the bottom. If you doing it a lot. you can have a router bit or shaper cutter made. For one shot, I'd do it in two steps.
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