Better way to cut a mortise in a post?

I am building an out door shower out of Meranti and cedar posts. I'm putting tongue and groove boards between 2 pieces of 3/4 x 3/4 slotted stock that has about 2" on each end left to stick into a receiving hole in the posts.
I am using a 1" forstner bit to cut the bulk out and then a chisel to remove the rest. The problem is I'm trying to get a nice snug fit and it is a bear chisling out these holes. Does anybody have a more clever way to chip away the walls on the holes to fit?
-Jim
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jtpr wrote:

Use a drawbored joint and allow a bit of slop in the mortise?
Chris
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Probably a little late now, but you could have built up the posts out of 1x or 5/4x and left out sections for the mortises.
R
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Well... usually the piece with the tenon has a shoulder for two reasons.
1. To add racking and push in strength to the joint. 2. To hide the edges of the mortise.
In fact, I'll usually chamfer the edges the mortise to capture any squeeze out.
Also, many people back cut the shoulder into the tenon for the same reason (squeeze out capture) and so the outer edge of the shoulder has unimpeded contact with the face of the post.
Also, as I just noted in another thread, if you mark the mortise shape using a knife to cut the lines, then the chisel will be more accurate.

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You could cut about 1" deep with a router (using some sort of guide). This would remove all but the corners down to the reach of your router bit. Continue as before, but now you have a nice reference surface for your chisel.
-S

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"jtpr" wrote:

The Pat Barber method.
A plunge router, a homemade router jig for M/T joints and a 3/8" spiral upcut router bit.
Break the tenon corners to fit.
Lew
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Your method will work..but here is a much faster method:
http://www.shopnotes.com/issues/090/extras/plunge-router-mortising-jig /
jtpr wrote:

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on 7/14/2009 11:52 AM (ET) jtpr wrote the following:

Others have mentioned using a router. I don't know what kind of tools you have available (other than a drill and chisel). The fastest and easiest way is with a table saw, or radial arm saw, with a dado blade set. If you don't have either, maybe a friend or neighbor has the tools you need.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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on 7/16/2009 9:46 AM (ET) willshak wrote the following:

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I don't know if your posts are milled lumber or not. If you can get a jig saw blade long enough, you might drill holes at the ends of the slot in the post and cut the remaining wood between the holes with the jig saw. A sawzall might work also.
I've made mortises in fence posts by defining the mortises with a router and finishing with a chisel.
That being said, I would just chop the mortises with one of my 2" chisels.
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