Best wall to deaden sound

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Homasote is pretty much the standard sound absorber for construction purposes. It must be used in a dry location however. Heh, no problem here, less than 4" of rain this year.
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wf.

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it's great of HO train layouts too!
dave
randee wrote:

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Resilient channel can be very effective, IF installed properly (not difficult but there is definitely a right way and several wrong ways). Do some Internet searching on installation techniques. Here are a couple of links to get started.
http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/channel.htm
http://www.usg.com/design_solutions/2_3_4_acoustictips.asp
http://www.usg.com/Expert_Advice/pdf/handbook_complete.pdf
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=%22resilient+channel%22
You will also want to learn about 'acoustic sealant' and the various types of expanding foams available in aerosol cans for sealing ALL joints, cracks, utility perforations, etc. Connecting doors must be weatherstripped, sill seal must be effective. Read up also about how to deal with 'flanking noise'. You have received some suggestions about how to decouple the floor slab, should it prove necessary (you may want to get on-site professional advice here to avoid cutting utilities or compromising structural integrity). Similar concerns may also pertain to vibrations transmitted from the shop ceiling and exterior walls through their structural connections to the house.
David Merrill

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There aren't a whole lot of continuous loud high-frequency metal shop sounds, just the occasional angle grinder and shop vac. Not like a wood shop.
Anyway it takes only another inch to make a staggerred double wall. Fir out the top and bottom plates an inch, then build another 2x4 wall with studs at the halfway spacing an inch out from the existing drywall, and hang the new drywall from that.
Anyway if you need to hang stuff on the wall, make a plywood sandwich. Sheath the wall with plywood or OSB, then drywall over that.
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I worked at a construction site for a x-ray lab. On the walls they used what looked like plain old sheet rock, but it had a layer of lead sheet under the paper on one face. It probably would be wonderful stuff for noise too. The gent installing it said it was spendy! Greg
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 18:49:31 GMT, "Michael Daly"
| |> Years ago, when we built an anechoic chamber for testing acoustic stuff in we |> used alternating stud walls with a lead curtain "woven" through them.| |I remember seeing a demonstration of the effectiveness of this many years ago. |I keep wondering if there's another good substitute that is perceived safer. |Aluminum foil is too light. Steel too stiff and springy (you don't want it to vibrate). |Lead was perfect in that it was heavy and really damped out vibration since it |wasn't very elastic. | |Metal coated with plastic? Like old toothpaste tubes (aluminum, not the |lead ones). That would seem about right. Does such a thing exist?
Depleted uranium. Should be some one the Middle East surplus market by now. Rex in Fort Worth
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Peter W. Meek wrote:

He's got it right!!!! Many years ago my parents bought a building and converted it to art and music lesson studios. I was asked about designing walls to separate practise rooms. Imagine one student practising trumpet in one room and another doing harp in the adjacent room. I came up with the same thing Peter suggested except that the 2x6 bottom and top plates were separated from floor and ceiling by a layer of acoustic board and secured with as few nails as practical. The insulation was just the usual "pink" but the acoustic blanket would probably be better. It worked well. We never got a complaint.
Ted
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All good suggestions from Peter. Concrete block works very well. To add to an existing wall, apply sound board (Homosote) and 5/8" drywall, one or two layers. Resilient furring channel can be used. Use acoustic caulk at all the cracks, sound seals at the doors. I used to have a book published by US Gypsum, a drywall maker that spec'd various wall constructions for sound walls among others. A Google search might turn up something. I built a 12 screen movie theater that used double studs, Fiberglas sound batts and three layers of 5/8" rock on each side and one layer in the middle to isolate the theaters. That worked real well. It all depends on budget and available room. Tom
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Prior to drywalling - fill the cavity with a dense insulation.
Double wall with drywall. You need and want as much sound deadening mass between your noise source and where it will travel. This will also provide you a 2 hour rated fire rating.
Jim

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The isolated surfaces is exactly the way to go, but just spraying the wall full of cellulose insulation is much easier and probably cheaper than your blanket.
Kevin
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If you can, build a second wall and hang cabinetes on it. Have a second door, so you open one door and are in a very short hall with maybe closets on each side. If your hot water heater is next to the wall you want to sound proof, enclose it. Use solid core doors with weather stripping.
Just more ideas for consideration. Dan
have an opinion for the best wall treatment to deaden sound travel

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<snip>

Just don't forget that if your hot water heater is gas, you need sufficient make-up air for combustion (louvers, louvered door, large gap at floor.) Just a reminder.
Jim
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Glass wool insulation bats, with drywall over.
Steve Rayner.

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I was a contractor, and faced exactly this problem for a client. The client wanted an effective but inexpensive solution that didn't take a lot of interior space. My solution was the following, which the client found satisfactory:
1) I first sealed the old wall to avoid any air exchange that would transmit sound. I also went into the shopside ceiling and heavily blocked and sealed the space between joists.
2) Then I built a new studwall by turning the studs sideways and using a 2x2 for sill and plate. I firmly attached this to floor and ceiling, but floated it away from the old wall by about 1/2" without attachment. I filled this new wall space with thin unbacked insulation until it was well-packed.
3) To the new wall, I glued and screwed 2 layers of 5/8" gypsum wallboard without furring strips between.
The result was inexpensive and was very effective. No structural modifications were necessary, and the loss of floorspace in the shop was only ~3.25"
Post-script: The client had bolted his mill and lathe to the floor, but found that he had to put them on laminated wood platforms overlaying rubber pads to avoid sound transmission directly through the concrete floor to the rest of the house.
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I hear that this stuff works well, although I've only seen it used once and have never personally installed it. Certainly it would improve on the process I suggested.
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