Best wall to deaden sound

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Anyone have an opinion for the best wall treatment to deaden sound travel from the shop in the garage to the rest of the house ?
I figgure the candadates are:
1. Doubled drywall.
2. Plywood.
Thanks for the opinions.
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Egg cartons they are about a foot sq and by now probably cost about 10 cents each. I used them to pack machine parts in when I had my machine shop. I have heard of them used by garage bands to deaden sound. Jim

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Those are *extremely* flamable. Remember the Great White fire?
Gary
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    Greetings and Salutations.... On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 10:45:58 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

    And, I suspect, if one were to spray them down with waterglass on front and back before installing, that would cut down on the flammability quite a bit too.     A bit over the top is this: http://www.technology.niagarac.on.ca/students/rcain/design.html (and here is a source for the foam pyramids) http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/products/foams/anechoic_wedge.asp     But it would work really well, and, I suspect, if one covers the wall with grill cloth for speakers, it would not get that nasty with dust, etc.     Regards     Dave Mundt
    (and no...I am NOT serious).
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wrote:

They're also flammable. <G>
Barry
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egg cartons do not make any difference to sound transmission, they're not heavy enough. at best they will absorb a little high frequency.
to stop sound going from one place to another, you need a combination of absorbsion and reflection. first layer absorbs as much as it can, next layer reflects the rest (brick wall is good). if the sound can vibrate the reflective layer, you will hear the soudn on theother side.
egg cartons cannot do any of this. forget em
do a Google search for things like 'drum shield' 'drum gobo' 'band practice noise absorbtion' etc
swarf, steam and wind
-- David Forsyth -:- the email address is real /"\ http://terrapin.ru.ac.za/~iwdf/welcome.html \ / ASCII Ribbon campaign against HTML E-Mail > - - - - - - -> X If you receive email saying "Send this to everyone you know," / \ PLEASE pretend you don't know me.
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Agreed. A layer of fire resistant over a layer of acoustic gypsum mounted on resiliant clips will stop almost all the low and mid range frequencies and good sealing will eliminate most of the highs.
Bob wrote:

--
Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
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Should be the same principles as in home theater design. DAGS on "home theater acoustic design tips". The link below also illustrates some options for sound isolation: http://www.hometheatermag.com/printarchives.cgi?140

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Got a lot of answers, thank you. Reading and thinking about them.

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Peter gave the best answer: alternating studs so that each side of the wall rests on a different set of studs. then of course, the heavier the material hung on the studs, the better.
dave
Scott Moore wrote:

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wrote:

Hi To stop sound going through a wall you need mass
to stop sound in the room you need surface treatmment to the wall ceiling & floor
you do say how the garage is attached to the house
but make the the walls heavy, biuls a brick wall or you could used plaster board
Any gaps like a door will let the sound through if there is a door then seal the frame and panel each side with something heavy, not plaster board it will crack if you slam the door
try shhet steel , plywood
weight is want you want
John O'Connell Customer support ------------------------------------- O C Fabrication Web page www.occuk.co.uk/fabs
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Scott Moore wrote:

Years ago, when we built an anechoic chamber for testing acoustic stuff in we used alternating stud walls with a lead curtain "woven" through them.
The public health gestapo would probably ban that sort of stuff now, huh?
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
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Have you actually tried this? I'd be worried that the sheetrock wasn't strong enough to support the pressure of the sand pushing out from the inside of the wall.
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wrote:

Me too. I wouldn't do it to my house. -- Jim in NC
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Roy Smith wrote: Have you actually tried this? I'd be worried that the sheetrock wasn't strong enough to support the pressure of the sand pushing out from the inside of the wall. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Actually, I have not. And I considered your concern, so I did the following calculation: Dry sand weights about 100 lb/cu ft, which calculates out to about .7 psi per foot of depth, or about 5 1/2 psi for an eight-foot high wall. That doesn't seem like a lot to me-- since the saving to be had by using sand are considerable, compared to all the other ideas suggested, I have two ideas. Nail sheetrock to two 2x4's to make a simulated wall section 16" on centers. Stand it up and pour it full of sand. See what happens. If you want to reduce the bursting tendency of sand, you could mix a little Portland cement and water with it--not to make real mortar--just to make it set up to a crusty concoction, that would hold up its own weight. Then, pour the walls in stages, allowing the stuff to set between pours, so you never have the full hydrostatic pressure of eight feet of sand against the sheet rock. This wall would behave the same as a "tilt-up," and would not burst.
I figure that a 10 foot wall would need about one yard of sand. Think of the savings, compared to staggered studs, lead sheeting, or special spacers, etc., plus all the labor to build these systems.
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On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 23:09:21 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"

Umm, that's 792 pounds per square foot at the bottom of the wall. That sounds like a LOT to me. 957 pounds of pull-away force for every foot of attachment where the drywall is fastened to the studs of a normal 16" on center wall. Even if you fastened it strongly enough to the studs, that kind of pull might even split the studs lengthways.
-- --Pete
http://www.msen.com/~pwmeek /
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"Peter W. Meek" wrote:

Not to mention what putting a wet mixture against the backside of the sheetrock could get you into...Shoosh!
Me thinks this isn't your finest hour Leo. (Ducking...)
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."

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It isn't. ;-) Replace the sheetrock with 1/2" plywood then top the ply with sheetrock. As others have mentioned doors are a bigger problem.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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If you have the wall open, split the studs with a circular saw. Just make a cut the lenght of the stud top to bottom down the middle. It will give the isolated wall at no cost. Be careful around any wiring! Add sound batts, then 1 layer of sound board and 1 of rock then finish. If it's still too noisy you could isolate the machine on the floor the same way, by sawing all the way through the concrete slab and filling the crack with acoustic caulk. No cost except the rental on the concrete saw. Or give the better half a headset. Tom

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Scott,
The z channel and double drywall (with insulation between house and garage) will work to cut down the airborn sound transmission but since the garage and house share the same slab the vibration induced sound will still be transmitted. The air space between the two layers of drywall is the main source of the sound absorption. Remember though that you will need to seal up all air leaks between the two rooms; every single one, no exceptions. You may also need to install a different door between the house and garage. If you want to reduce the vibration induced sound you will need to decouple the slab in the garage from the house. You can do that by cutting out a small stip of the slab (say an inch wide) and fill it with rubber. If you don't want to do that then consider using vibration isolation mounts between your machines and the floor; you will still have the same anchorage properties but you'll effectively isolate the machine from the concrete slab.
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