Bandsaw won't start

I have a Laguna LT18 Bandsaw that's about 5 years old. It has low hours on it from hobby use only. I've never had any problems with it before this morning. I was cutting a couple of boards last night and used the brake/shut off pedal to turn it off as I have many times before. I went to make a cut this morning and it won't power up. The magnetic switch and stop button seem to be functioning properly albeit without the motor actually turning on. I checked the brake shut off switch and when I disconnected it the magnetic power switch didn't lock in anymore. This indicates that it is working fine. I've checked all the connections I can see and everything seems as it should. I can't find a reset button on the motor or the switch so I don't think there is one. Any ideas?
Neil
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I assume you're already checked the breaker, and any fuses that might be in the line (power strip etc.). Is there power at the outlet? If it's 220v, do both legs have power? Is the switch getting power? Time to get out the multimeter... When all else fails, just use Ctrl-Alt-Del or unplug and remove the battery. Andy
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Andy wrote:

Yes, it's 220v and there is power to the machine. I have another machine on the same breaker and it's working fine. I can take cover to the magnetic switch and see the many wires and I have a multimeter. The problem is I don't know how to test the unit. There is a "test" hole on the magnetic switch. I have no idea what this is for.
Neil
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toolguy wrote:

220 or 110 might help to know? Motor starter or just magnetic switched contacts? Don't know these so don't know specifics of the brake interlock so can't speculate there much.
One thing comes to mind--no actually two :) -- first, if is a motor starter, I'd expect there's a fusible link ("heater") inline w/ the motor, particularly if there's not a thermal reset on the motor itself. Check for it. Secondly, it may be simply dust/dirt accumulated in the starter/motor at some point preventing contact closure--take compressed air and blow out everything thoroughly.
After that, as someone else said, starting tracing continuity...
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220V. Magnetic switch but I don't know what you mean by a motor starter. The brake is a foot brake that you step on to engage a brake pad against the lower wheel. The arm of the brake engages a trip switch that shuts off the motor if the brake is applied by breaking contact. I can't find a fuse or reset button anywhere. There may be one, but I can't see it. Please explain where I should use compressed air?
Neil
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Here's my power switch:
http://www.klocknermoeller.com/pkz/pkzm0-20.htm
It's not magnetic (my error). Could someone please help me with what I should test on this and the stop button. I really don't think it's the motor.
TIA,
Neil
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On Sat, 14 Oct 2006 07:51:44 -0700, toolguy wrote: Any ideas?

Low hours or not ... does the motor just sit there silently or does it hum?
If it's silent, pop the access plate and look for voltage at the terminals.
If it hums, turn the power off and carefully try to turn the wheel by hand. If you can turn it freely by hand, flick the switch again ... there may just be a scrap awkwardly wedged inside. If it turns by hand but not by motor, spend about $5 replacing the starter capacitator (graingers is your friend).
Poke a pin in that reset hole for good measure.
Bill
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If the switch is such that you can take it apart without too much trouble, I'd try that (with the saw unplugged, of course). My "new" 10-yr old BS had the same problem when I first got it (power to the machine, but wouldn't turn on). Fortunately (or unfortunately, as magnetic would be nice) it was a simple double pole switch, and it was a matter of taking it off the machine, rubbing gunk off the contacts, and putting it back on the machine. Works fine now. A quality minute with the switch and a continuity tester would reveal whether this is your problem. Hope this helps, Andy
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Also try giving your motor a kick. seriously.
As of late, my 12" craftsman BS has been doing this. I turn it on, it hums but doesnt' move. I kick the motor and it runs.
I think I over stressed it when resawing some wide planks.
John
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John T wrote:

Mine did exactly like yours one time. I keep it in a tool shed. One Spring, the motor hummed and tried, but couldn't move the saw blade. It kinda twitched a little when turned on, but wouldn't turn. I pulled the side cover off the top band wheel housing and discovered a small mammal nest in the lower left corner made with fiberglass insulation stolen from a roll stored in the shed. I don't know whether it was a mouse or chipmunk that had taken up residence. Since then, I try to leave the cover off before Winter, or take the cover off before starting the saw.
--
Bill
in Hamptonburgh, NY
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I've beem waiting for years for an excuse to tell this story. When my Delta 14" band saw wouldn't start, the trail led quickly to the switch. After disassembling the metal box that holds the switch, the cause was obvious. There was a dead mouse in there. The largest hole into the electrical box was 1/4". It was way bigger when I found it. Sort of like a ship-in-a-bottle type puzzle.
Rodents are far too clever and strong for their size.
Nigel
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*snip*

*snip*
Sometimes you can move a switch back and forth many many times (just keep flipping it for a minute or two) and it will clean off enough of the stuff to work properly. For anything electrical, it's probably a good idea to do this with the power removed.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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