applying india ink over minwax stain?

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We have sanded our hardwood floors applied the minwax ebony oil based stain and the results were not nearly as dark as we wanted and they were uneven and blotchy, we do not want to resand.
I have been reading about india ink and was wondering if I could: Apply India Ink over the first coat on minwax stain Then apply 2 coats of semi-gloss floor poly
Would this work? If so, should I used oil or water based poly?
Another option I was considering was adding some of the ebony stain to the poly, applying 1 coat and then applying 1 coat of just the pure poly.
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What species of wood are you trying to stain? Maple is so hard that it does not absorb stain readily, even when it does it is not deep, a scratch can expose the almost white wood through your dark stain. Other woods will absorb stains more or less depending on species. I think india ink would not be a good idea for a floor. Too difficult to control, it is opaque not transparent and it is water based, it won't like being applied over an oil stain. Another coat of stain would be a lot easier.
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On Thursday, March 21, 2013 4:54:24 PM UTC-5, EXT wrote:

They are mesquite floors. We will try your idea of another coat of stain...should we try and only restain areas that are lighter? Or do you we just stain the whole uneven floor? What about our idea for adding some stain to first layer of poly?
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On 3/21/2013 5:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

restain areas that are lighter? Or do you we just stain the whole uneven floor? What about our idea for adding some stain to first layer of poly?

YOU ARE STAINING MESQUITE FLOORS????????/?????????
Do you know what they would look like with a clear finish?
Normally I say do what you want but you have a premium wood floor because of the way it looks naturally.
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On 3/21/2013 5:41 PM, Leon wrote:

Hey smartass ... I'm sure they look great with painted cherry cabinets!
;)
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On 3/21/2013 5:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

restain areas that are lighter? Or do you we just stain the whole uneven floor? What about our idea for adding some stain to first layer of poly?
You would be better off, IME, concentrating on the lighter areas IF you have the expertise. Just adding more stain to the entire floor is just going to keep most of the contrast between the light and dark intact.
Unless you're willing to start over, which may still be your ultimate solution, you really need some professional help to do your floors justice.
Continuing on your current course, and judging from your questions, you are on a collision course with making matters worse ... get some competent, professional help, ASAP, _before_ doing anything else.
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e.

Best advice so far. No reason to comment further.
I have done awful things to wood and wood products so that I can make my house payments. I am not proud of myself, but I figured that if I didn't do it, someone would.
There are things I can never understand, and blacking out mesquite s one of them. A nice toner would have pulled the whole floor together as one color... but never black.
It is hard to remember that in matters of taste, the customer is always right...
Robert
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On 3/22/2013 10:12 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why do I keep thinking that this floor may be in a rental property and the owners are unaware of what is going on?
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On Friday, March 22, 2013 12:51:59 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

We own our house.
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On 3/22/2013 7:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ok. ;~) We certainly appreciate your thick skin and putting up with us/me and our/my unyielding opinion about what you are doing.
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On 3/21/2013 3:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

and the results were not nearly as dark as we wanted and they were uneven and blotchy, we do not want to resand.

I'm having difficulty seeing through my tears to type this. Covering the grain on Mesquite should be unlawful. You mention in another post that the Mesquite had an orange tint? Perhaps someone used shellac on it. Mesquite has beautiful grain and I (personally) wouldn't call it "orange". I'm almost tempted to offer to come and refinish the floor for you. Hopefully it can be sanded down to the original wood and given a clear, water based finish of poly.
Max, wishing he had enough Mesquite to cover the floor in the den. :-(
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On 3/22/2013 9:54 AM, MaxD wrote:

Fresh sanded Mesquite often has an "orangy" tint.
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On 3/22/2013 11:50 AM, Leon wrote:

Leon, I'm trying to picture that. It's been awhile since I've had any Mesquite to mess with but I guess it could be called, "orangy". ;-)
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On 3/22/2013 1:44 PM, MaxD wrote:

LOL Absolutely not orange but a fresh cut or sanded spot on much is brown with a cast towards yellowy red. :~)
https://www.google.com/search?q=mesquite+wood&hl=en&safe=off&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44158598,d.aWc&biw 61&bihc7&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=fi&ei=rs5MUaiRIcHhygG-nIGwCQ
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On Friday, March 22, 2013 3:36:45 PM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

n with a cast towards yellowy red. :~) https://www.google.com/search?q=me squite+wood&hl=en&safe=off&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44158598,d .aWc&biw61&bihc7&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&t ab=fi&ei=rs5MUaiRIcHhygG-nIGwCQ
I don't know that I've ever seen any mesquite. Looks pretty darn nice, to me. I often visit this website. It has a variety of samples for comparis ons of woods. http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/
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On Friday, March 22, 2013 1:44:16 PM UTC-5, MaxD wrote:

Well our mesquite floor in OUR house was a light mesqhite wich was a light brown orangy tint.
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On Friday, March 22, 2013 7:12:37 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Update: Ok I think I understand that I shouldn't use india ink. I will forget about that.
What about if I mix 1:4 ratio of same minwax stain and oil based poly and do one coat...especially in areas that are lighter, then apply coat of oil based poly by itself on top. Would that work?
Also before doing that I was thinking of using a rag damped with mineral spirits to lightly remove a little stain in one area that is specifically way darker than the rest...
Does anyone think that process would turn out ok?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Possibly, if the vehicle in the stain is compatible with the poly. But why not just apply more stain?

If the vehicle in the stain is oil (most likely) and the oil has cured, mineral spirits won't dissolve it. Doing what you propose may physically remove some stain from the surface just by abrasion. You can do the same thing with any abrasive material...sand paper, sanding sponge, steel wool, etc.
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I would suggest you go with a dye. You can dye the wood directly or you can dye it using atoning process by adding it to a poly or shellac.
Use liquid Transtint dye. It is made by Homestead Finishing www.homesteadfi nishingproducts.com. They have black. It can be mixed with water or alcohol for direct application. Maybe 10-20 drops per pint of liquid. I would use water. Alcohol dries to fast and can leave streaks. Alcohol is very flammab le. Rag it on, just soak a rag and keep soaking it. Wear good gloves and lo ng sleeves. It may not like the oil stain being there but it will dye every thing. Water will want to seep back out of seams and leave bad dark spots w hen it dries so keep wiping down until dry, then watch and wipe more. It wi ll look dead and dull when it dries but one drop of poly and it will be bea utiful.
You can use the same Transtint as a toning agent in shellac or poly but thi s is much harder to get even and won't wear evenly.
Forget the naysayers. People have been ebonizing wood for centuries so it i s a classic design. Also, it is your home and will be beautiful. I say dye it!
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------------------------------------------------------ The obvious solution is to install black carpeting.
The owners get the color floor they want and the floor gets protected from an owner who truly doesn't appreciate what they have.
Lew
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