apply laminate to rough or smooth side of masonite ? ? ?

wreckites -
am making a window trim "L" assembly for 30" window side jambs of 3/4" white melamine with 1/8" oak edging; it is rabbeted to receive a 1/4" masonite/hardboard stuff for the jambs, to be 'weldwooded' (tm) (along with edge of 3/4" melamine where rabbeted) with white melamine...
said assembly to be embedded in the existing window opening with (no doubt) too many overly-large globs of caulk/adhesive, that will make a plumb fit difficult, ooze out all over everything you didn't clear out of the way because you knew you were going to be careful (not like that last time), and still -after kicking your own ass around for a half hour- come to the conclusion that you'll have to rip it out and do it right the second time...
back to the mattter at paw...
the particular scrap of hardboard i have, has a rough side and an ultra smooth side... which side would be more appropriate as the outer surface to receive the melamine ? ? ? i *thought* that i would want the smooth/hard surface on the inside to resist any potential moisture infiltration, but didn't know if the rough side would adhere well enough...
thanks for random opinions, explanations of how it was done back in the day, stories of how a rogue piece of laminate once decapitated the second cousin of a friend's father's co-worker, and cranky, over-sensitive inertnet posters who delight in saying 'you could g-g-g-google it, you stupid, lazy, newbie scum'...
...oh, if you could help me out with the question, that would be nice too... hhh
charleyy
eof
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If it were me, I'd apply it to the smooth side. I assume you are using contact cement and the more surface area that is available, the better the contact. At least that is my theory. SH

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