Any way around a jointer?

Page 2 of 2  


You are right about the planer not making wood square. OTOH, depending on where you get your wood, you can get by without a jointer. I have so far, but it is on my list of "needs".
The places I buy my wood will at a minimum give me an edge and a flat bottom so I can finish it omn my planter and table saw. Some will joint and plane to whatever thickness I specify. It is included in the price.
If you are using air dried wood from Grampa's barn, buy the jointer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's a viable alternative, DAGS on shooting board.
Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
reply-to doesn't work
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No way around it. No woodworking was ever done before the jointer was invented.

using
articles
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In the beginning, I started with a Ryobi AP-10, a 10" planer. For a short while, I was putting rough stock through it, but that stock was pretty straight to begin with. I then got a 6" jointer, but some pieces, like bed rails were still too wide, so I also put them through the planer w/o benefit of a jointer. The moral is that whether or not you must use a jointer depends. It depends on your stock, your projects, how much you want to work them by hand, etc., etc.
On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 14:17:18 -0800, "Daniel Grieves"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am in the same situation, and here's what I do:
I use a 13" delta planer, and a PC router in a table with a 2 1/2" freud straight bit. I take the rough stock and run it through the planer on both sides until parallelism is obtained. Then I take the best edge I have on the board and joint that using the router setup mentioned above. (See Pat Warners site on doing the edge jointing if you aren't sure). I then take the opposite edge and rip that along a fence on either the table or bandsaw.
Works great with one rare exception. If I have a stick that is warped along it's length and it's pretty long, then all the planer will do is replicate the warp, where a jointer would flatten it. I've had it happen once, but it really didn't matter if the board was slightly warped since the rest of the structure would flatten it once it was screwed in anyway. I don't feed my family doing this, and it beats spending a ton of money and space on a 12" jointer to match my planer width
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dan, if what your looking for is a way to straighten an edge on rough stock, use your table saw with a straight edge.Leave stock 1/8" oversize, then take this amount off with next pass. This will give you an acceptable edge. I won't go into numerous other ways. hand planing,router etc.I suggest if you do not already have a jointer plane or at least a jack plane, look for either a used one or buy new.Your portable plane should be able to plane square if the fence is 90 degrees to the table. The table is too short to use to straighten an edge.Look for a handplane at least 18" long with a decent iron.
mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.