Am I getting ripped? Local lumber yard

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Ok, I can see that. It just really gives me, personally, the heebeegeebees. I'll attribute it to my own jointer issues.
Note - intelligence in the shop is greatly reduced by fatigue, hunger and deadlines.
Back to the main topic - if you're shopping at one of those hardwood boutiques, you ought to be able to carefully hand-select your boards. I know I always do, and I've never had a problem. I carefully restack everything, and if a questioning employee comes around, I remark how beautfiul the board (I'm rejecting) is, but note that it's just not quite what I'm looking for. It helps if you're loading close to every other board on your cart, as opposed to rifling the whole stack.
O'Deen
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Patrick Olguin wrote:

Considering how much trouble I have coping with even marginal geometry problems in a board, and considering how much more they're charging compared to those mail order places, I make no apologies for getting out and looking at every single piece of whatever lumber in the entire rack if I have to. Usually takes me a couple hours to buy a few bf of lumber, but now that I know what to avoid in the first place, I'm having much better success making it into stuff that doesn't do bad things.
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a bunch of 4/4 birch from MacBeath's in Berkeley once, and they gave me a $.50/b.f. discount because I restacked the pile so neatly. That's what he said anyways. The clerk was very appreciative & remarked how often people rifle through the piles & just leave them.
A construction lumber yard in our area was a different story. A guy just about ripped me to pieces when I was rejecting some 2x6 redwood because it had gouges taken out where the shipping straps cut into them. He was pissed! I still stacked everything nice & neat when done, but that didn't matter to this guy.
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mike snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net (Michael Dembroge) wrote in \

He probably marked you as a noob he could unload bad stuff on when you came in and was pissed because you weren't.
Screw him. I agree with what others say....if the quality of the lumber/product is crap or affected by handling, we are under no obligation whatsoever to just settle for it....
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I agree with George. But I must confess that I go against the grain of tradition. Most of my projects require widths greater than 6" and I have a 6" jointer. So I plane both surfaces in the surface planer. This works well unless you have really twisted or warped pieces. So cut them to rough length first. (If they are still too warped/twisted be more careful in selection or change suppliers) You should easily get 3/4" finished dimensions from 4/4 stock. Then you can joint an edge before proceeding to the tablesaw.
Joe...

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"George:
I also agree, great advice. I been taught that you need to remove the crown from boards prior to getting a good straight edge.
Dave: place the board, edge up on your joiner. See if it rocks, if so, you have a crown in the board, you got to remove it. The suggestion is to drop the crown part on the joiner, carefully!!!, and take a small pass until it stops rocking, then take a final pass. I think a good handplane would also help this and perhaps might be safer, tho, I've done the joiner procedure and still have all ten digits.
Also, Dave, check the face of your boards. Make sure you've don't have any warp or cup in them. Again, place the board on your joiner, face side down, and check to see if it rocks by pressing the back. If it does, you got to lift the back up, slightly, to take the cup out. I've used slivers as shims in the back to lift the back, so that the leading front edge is flat to the table.
I'm sure there's some book somewhere that tells you all this, but I learned in a woodworking class taught by an excellant instructor.
What area of the country are you in?
MJ Wallace
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MJ:
Thanks for the tips. I seem to do ok with cupping and crowning. I have the most trouble with a twisted board. Cannot do anything with a joiner. I have been taking a piece of melamine, laying the twisted board on it, shimming the gaps and running through the planer. Tedious, and I need a hot glue gun for shims, but appears to work. Does this sound right?

Richmond, Va.
dave
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Depends on the grade you are buying.
http://muextension.missouri.edu/explore/agguides/forestry/g05052.htm
and
http://www.ahec.org/hardwoods/grading.html
Dave wrote:

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Thanks for the great advice!
I think maybe I need to eat some pride and get some instruction. I guess I figured having the right tools would take care of everything. While my end products have come out great, I am very slow. Probably would enjoy it more if I knew what I was doing.
Sounds like a self realization. Ya'll should have fun with that one.
One last question, should the grade of the lumber be labeled, or will I need to ask.
FYI. This place has a large stock of cherry and were selling at $3.60 bf. Again, end product was very nice.
d
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You may want to consider taking a course at an Adult Ed or Community College, or a place like Woodcraft. There are a lot of things you can figure out or learn by watching a tape or TV show. Then there are things that you can work on for a couple of hours and just not get it. Then someone with experience can show you how in just a coupe of minutes.
First step is to enjoy what you are doing. My projects are no where near the quality of the pieces I see posted by the guys here. OTOH, my audience truly appreciates what I make for them so that is all I need to keep me going and learning and getting better at it.
Second step is to learn how to fix your mistakes. If a piece is too short, just cut it again and again until it is long enough. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome .
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

The trick is never show your work to someone who's a better woodworker than you are... :)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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May or may not be labeled. May or may not be properly labeled.
Check the hardwood grading criteria at http://www.tsiwood.com/lumbergrading.htm
In reality, if you see more than one knot in an 8' board, or more than 10% 4" boards, you're pretty much down to #1 common, the lowest grade you can rely on to have furniture lengths available without really searching through your stack. Only that or higher is worth storing under controlled circumstances, IMHO.

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