airless spraying

many thanks to rob for his info. this thing lays down more material more quickly than anything i've ever used. I have learned a few things while using it. using the tip specified by the coatings manufacturer results in way more material flow than I can keep up with. I got serious runs using the 0.17 tip for exterior latex. too old to move that fast. I guess. had better results with the 0.1f tip. i'm seriusly impressed with this unit. I used to try thinning the material to spray with my hvlp unit snd the results were not optimal. this thing doesn't even break a sweat pushing unthinned latex through a tip one size smaller than spec and the valspar paint that i'm using lays and levels perfectly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
many thanks to rob for his info. this thing lays down more material more quickly than anything i've ever used. I have learned a few things while using it. using the tip specified by the coatings manufacturer results in way more material flow than I can keep up with. I got serious runs using the 0.17 tip for exterior latex. too old to move that fast. I guess. had better results with the 0.1f tip. i'm seriusly impressed with this unit. I used to try thinning the material to spray with my hvlp unit snd the results were not optimal. this thing doesn't even break a sweat pushing unthinned latex through a tip one size smaller than spec and the valspar paint that i'm using lays and levels perfectly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Excellent!
Usually the complaint with these smaller units is that they don't put out enough material, or that it has to be thinned quite a bit.
I am glad to help, and glad you are pleased with your choice!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Robert:
I've been using the hell out of this thing and still love it.
I have to confess to a terrible sin. I am not usually an abuser of tools but once in awhile I try an experiment, or two.
I started out using the cleaning procedure outlined in the manual, religiously. Then I ran into some weather problems and decided to experiment (cheat) a little bit. I had three days of down time for rain and just left the tubes in the five, with saran wrap stuffed into the opening, released the pressure at the valve but did not pull the trigger on the gun. I left the gun in a five gallon can of water for three days and when I fired her up, she ran perfectly. All I had to do was peel the paint scab off the orifice.
That's not the good (bad) part.
I ran into more weather and time difficulties that extended to two weeks and tried the same trick.
Same result. Peel the scab and she ran like a champ. Some minor rust discoloration, easily removed with a nylon brush. Didn't have to re- prime - just fired it up in paint mode - the pump ran for a few beats and she was ready to spray. And it sprays just as perfect as it did out of the box.
Now, I'm not recomending that folks abuse their tools this way but - for someone who will be using this thing every couple or few days throughout this summer, it's nice to know that I CAN get away with it.
At the end of the summer I'm going to give it a good tear down and then I'll see what I've really done to it.
tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Years ago, I borrowed a friend's CH airless (contractor size) because I was unhappy with the results of a roller on my shop ceiling. I had gotten a quarter of the ceiling done with the roller and I was whipped, everything was a mess, and I was going with an OSB surface on the rest until Gus told me had had an airless I could use. Set up to clean-up was under four hours for the first coat. If I'd known how to use the tool, it would have been an hour shorter, I think, most of that being clean-up. I already had tools and such covered with painter's film, of course. The big thing is, it laid down two coats faster than the stuff would dry enough to accept the second. I came back that afternoon and spent 60-70 minutes doing the second coat on the entire 1200 SF ceiling, just about as fast as I could move around the room without breaking my neck. I could hardly believe it, as it had taken most of a day to pole roll the quarter or so I'd done ONE coat on earlier. And my arm was barely tired, while the roller was raising Cain with my arm and shoulder joint.
I can understand why contractors pay big bucks for the good ones. I'd tried using some of the quart sized Wagners years before and decided the whole genre was crap. Nope. Just the quart sized ones, I guess.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom ...
I remember your earlier posts, but can't recall which model you settled on. With this review, I'm gonna get one as I have a two-story home to paint this summer. Now if I can just talk the bride into letting me buy a cherry picker <G>.
Larry
Tom Watson wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.