After-market Tablesaw Wings

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Ah, always dreaming ahead like me. :^) Back when I bought my bandsaw, I got what is currently the Powermatic PWBS-14CS. Not sure what the exact model number was back then, but it was priced close to an equivalent Jet, except the Powermatic had many "extras" that easily made it a better value. Now I see there's a little more difference in price but it's still a great value for everything you get. The Powermatic is an awesome machine and maybe even a little more than I need. I still have to try re-sawing one of these days...
John S.
On 04/11/2012 09:53 AM, Drew Lawson wrote:

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That is one that has my attention.
I've been focused on the Rikon 10-325 for a while. That was a combination of price and cutting height. But over time, the price difference between that and the Powermatic with riser block has shrunk.
Roughing turning bowl blanks is the justification for a band saw. But once I have it, I'm sure I'll try some resawing.

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On Wed, 11 Apr 2012 14:53:43 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@furrfu.invalid (Drew

One thing that I consider detrimental about cast iron is it's weight. Supporting that weight is often a problem and under certain circumstances, that weight tends to affect alignment. Also, it rusts.
It sounds a little like your desire for cast iron is more you just being enamored with it than having a real need for it. The only practical reasons I can see for cast iron is that it's probably flat and likely to stay that way. Finally, it's an unyielding solid surface that you can use to hammer things on.
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Dave wrote:

I find that fairly compelling. I'd pay $200-250 for a cast iron top. But TS-add ons I see seem to start closer to $300-400 and have non-trivial install. And I suspect one still has to buy an appropriate router insert.

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The router insert is open to discussion. On my cast iron contractor's table saw wing, I used a cut off wheel in a grinder to cut away the enough of the ribs underneath. Then used a hack saw to cut a round circle for my Makita 3612br router, which I bolted directly to the wing. This was some 35 years ago. Took me about three hours to do the entire job.
If it had been an insert, I suspect the process would have been much easier. Hacksaw to cut a square plate out and bolted on retention supports to stop the insert from falling through.
To be honest though, considering the weight of the cast iron wing and the added weight of the router, I'd go with a melamine wing these days. Easier, faster, cheaper. Can't beat those three reasons.
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I like cast iron because it is, within my conditions and lifetime, unchanging. If it is flat when I get it, it will still be flat the day I die. (All assuming I take enough care to prevent rust.)
And, once things are assembled and upright, I consider the weight to be a major benefit. Turning the saw upright was a pain in several body parts, but I only have to do that once. After that, it is all inertia to resist vibration.
Do I *need* the wings to be cast iron? Certainly not. If I absolutely needed that, I'd have held out until I could afford a saw in the next price step. But I'm a hobbiest. I don't really need a table saw. It's a really cool toy. I make my living in a cubical.
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On Apr 10, 12:45pm, snipped-for-privacy@furrfu.invalid (Drew Lawson) wrote:

I don't intend to be a smart-a** but it sounds like your are re- thinking your original purchase. As I recall your saw is in the $500 range and, in the stores, it looks like a pretty nice machine. But if you start adding a $400 router table wing and cast iron on the other side you are getting into the range of some 3hp cabinet saws or 2hp hybrids. Here is a cheaper cast router table wing if it will fit. Also a Hybrid and another saw that if fitted with the wing would be a pretty good upgrade for a little more money. I have a Grizzly 1023S that is fitted with a shop made router table extension and fence that was largely made from scrap. it is as good and as versatile as some of the expensive ones. The extension table is within the length of the saws rails.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Router-Extension-Table-for-Table-Saw/H7507 http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-3-HP-220V-Cabinet-Left-Tilting-Table-Saw/G1023RL http://www.grizzly.com/search/search.aspx?q=table%20saw&cachebuster=2412836803658641
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No, but I am a life-long daydreaming window shopper.
If I can swap out the side tables in a year or two, I'd like to know it is possible. If it is possible, but $400 per side, I have better ways to spend the money, but I'd still like to know.
I've been browsing all sorts of accessories (shop made and commercial) that I have no current need for, but I like knowing what the possible range of use is. This is the first saw I've had that is anywhere near standard size and detail, so some things have been pointless to look at before.

A few weeks has shown that I hardly have room for this saw. Any more saw would be a problem. Any saw requiring 220 would be a dust collector for at least a few years to come (until a major garage reworking).

No shop-made table from my shop will satisfy the cast iron fetish.

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On Tue, 10 Apr 2012 14:15:54 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

www.grizzly.com has 'em for Griz saurs. With a little ingenuity, they might be made to fit other saur brands, too.
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Probably available from a repair parts store.
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On Tue, 10 Apr 2012 17:45:39 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@furrfu.invalid (Drew Lawson) wrote:

I doubt there are aftermarket cast iron wings sold; saws vary as to the dimension of the top.
What might work is to get some as replacement parts from a manufacturer. If you can find a model of saw with the right wing dimensions to work with your saw, perhaps you could order those. My guess is the main dimension to worry about is front to back depth.
The way the ones on my saw work, there are two or three bolts that goe through holes in the wing into mating threaded holes on my central top. If your table has such an arrangement, and you had a suitable sized wing but the mounting holes don't line up, you could drill new ones. I'd guess you want slightly oversized holes to allow adjustments.
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Just stumbled across this, which has a 50 lb. cast iron wing
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/router_table4.html#cast_iron_exten_anchor
John S.
On 04/10/2012 12:45 PM, Drew Lawson wrote:

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