Accuracy of Compound Mitre Saws

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I am very tempted to buy myself a compound mitre saw which will be used almost exclusively for cabinet type work where absolute accuracy is essential. I guess the accuracy of any piece of machinery is in some way proportional to the cost. My question - is it possible to achieve absolute accuracy with a mitre saw and if so and where, on the scale of cheap-and-cheerful to money-no-object-of-the-range can one expect to achieve the accuracy I am looking for? Any recommendations will be gratefully received. Gary
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Accuracy is dependant on how often and how carefully you change the settings. You want day in and day out accuracy buy a table saw sled and one of these.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=1&page2922&category=1,42884
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Sun, Jul 4, 2004, 4:24pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@myhouse.com puts out: <snip> buy a table saw sled <snip> Buy?
JOAT Just because it's not nice doesn't mean it's not miraculous. - Interesting Times
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On Sun, 4 Jul 2004 13:24:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

you would ever need one. Bought or otherwise.
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Sun, Jul 4, 2004, 5:47pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@myhouse.com says: JOAT, I've seen examples of your woodworking 'skills' and I can't imagine that you would ever need one. Bought or otherwise.
ROTFLMAO You don't actually think you've seen everything I've made, do you? But, as at happens, I do have a saw sled. That I made. It works quite well too, accurate. Perhaps you saw pictures. The one with the thick base, and 2X4s, all painted yellow, with lightning bolts on it. LOL I think that's the 3d I made. I'll eventually replace it, but it's still accurate, so no rush. I'm not half as bothered by it's looks as a lot of people were. You don't think those lightning bolts were for me, do you? LMAO I decided not to paint the next one, because I changed this one so much, and the paint made gluing a bit trying.
I'm fairly sure I never posted any shots of my wooden cam clamps, or turned mallets, especially the ones with the homemade oil finish (from my cooking oil finish experiments) - those are actually pretty. Probably won't. In truth tho, neither actually take much "skill", anybody could dupe them, but they do look nice - and work great. There's links for cam clamp making in the archives, but, if not, a quick google should turn some up.
If I wasn't having fun woodworking, I wouldn't do it.
JOAT Just because it's not nice doesn't mean it's not miraculous. - Interesting Times
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On Sun, 4 Jul 2004 17:15:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

I also woodwork to the tune of my own drummer. Some of my best efforts were made from my neighbors firewood pile.

I once stained a game board with an iron, a wet pair of new jeans, and a bingo dabber. <g>

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We have a lot in common. A lot of my efforts have ended up on the firewood pile. Ed
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Ed, Maybe you should be using hickory and mesquite for your projects, so instead of firewood you can use it for your "Q". ;-) Mark L.
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

Likewise ... did chicken, pork loin, brisket and sausage in the big smoker yesterday with mesquite. Today I don't even want to smell/taste smoke of any kind.
--
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Sun, Jul 4, 2004, 10:54pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@myhouse.com claims: <snip> Some of my best efforts were made from my neighbors firewoodpile. <snip>
Any pictures you may have seen of my stuff was of the quality stuff. One day maybe I'll post some pictures of some of the ugly stuff.
Best start stealing from all the neighbors, so he won't gett suspicious.
JOAT Just because it's not nice doesn't mean it's not miraculous. - Interesting Times
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"Gary Dean" wrote in message

I have my doubts as to whether "absolute accuracy" is obtainable, or even necessary, with wood and woodworking machinery.
My Makita LS1013 is certainly accurate enough for trim work. Consider that theoretically there should be less flex and runout at the edge of a 10" blade, then with a 12" blade.
For "accurate" miters in fine furniture, I use a table saw sled (picture on the jigs and fixture page on the site below).
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My Porter Cable 3802L miter saw is dead-on accurate especially for the stopped angles. For non-stopped angles, there can be a little error in your setting of the angle due to parallax, but a couple test cuts and an accurate protractor generally dial it in easily. I use it for furniture miters, and trim miters. Crown moulding compound miters are perfect. The dual lasers on either side of the kerf is GREAT. No complaints what-so-ever.
Brian.

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I also purchased the Porter-Cable 3802L after an extensive research for accuracy in miter saws. Even though a lot of people are thinking that a sliding 10" miter saw is usually very accurate (Makita LS1013 or the Hitachi's), a fixed 12" miter saw is even more accurate. And it's not me who claims it but Mr. John White in his book "Care and Repair of Shop Machines" at page 180in the upper left corner.
Book link: (Amazon.com product link shortened)88975655/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8551983-9227352?v=glance&s=books
Unless you need the 12" cutting capacity that a sliding miter saw provides, you will be a lot more satisfied with a high quality 12" regular miter saw as for accuracy.
Wally
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Wally wrote:

I have one also.
I didn't do much research, I just looked how the saw and it's competition were built.
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Mark

N.E. Ohio
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wrote:
|I am very tempted to buy myself a compound mitre saw which will be used |almost exclusively for cabinet type work where absolute accuracy is |essential. I guess the accuracy of any piece of machinery is in some |way proportional to the cost. My question - is it possible to achieve |absolute accuracy with a mitre saw and if so and where, on the scale of |cheap-and-cheerful to money-no-object-of-the-range can one expect to |achieve the accuracy I am looking for? Any recommendations will be |gratefully received.
Nothing is absolutely accurate, however, I find my 12" DeWalt (non-sliding) CMS to be adequately accurate and nearly bulletproof.
I've routinely crosscut stock for dovetailed drawers and face frames, which I think is a fair test of whether things are square or not. If there is one occasional downside it is minor chipout on the exit side of the cut.
But this is with the original blade that I have used (and abused) for years. I framed my house addition, cut pvc and abs pipe, aluminum stock and chopped up 2X lumber for firewood that's been laying on the ground for an extended time. And my neighbor built his house addition with it too.
One of these days I'll get it sharpened or buy a better crosscut blade. [g]
Wes
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Wes wrote:

tooth crosscut blade (Freud) and I no longer have the chipout problem you describe.
Glen
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Wes wrote:

tooth crosscut blade (Freud) and I no longer have the chipout problem you describe.
Glen
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Wes wrote:

tooth crosscut blade (Freud) and I no longer have the chipout problem you describe.
Glen
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Wes wrote:

tooth crosscut blade (Freud) and I no longer have the chipout problem you describe.
Glen
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