A tip for maling multiple parts of the same shape

I have a small project that I am working on that requires 28 small shelf support brackets that need to be identical. Making 3 or 4 is typically no problem but having 28 all the same can be tough. Needless to say, make a master pattern jig and use a pattern bit with a router and you are set. If working with small pieces with curves this pattern jig may be a little tougher to build. I made the master piece and simply stuck some clear cabinet door bumpers on to it and then set my blanks on top of the bumpers. I used the master to trace the design onto the blanks then cut close to that line on the band saw to remove a majority of the waste. From there I set the blanks on the master and ran the master up against the bearing on the pattern bit. The rubber bumpers provide just the right amount of "friction/stick to the blanks to keep them from slipping even when using the blank to guide the wood through the routing process. I posted pictures on a.b.p.w. of the set up. A picture is worth 1000 words. ;~)
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Sounds like a vacuum clamped template jig I've seen, like [1] but that's not the one I was thinking about. In essence, the vacuum holds the template to the part so you can use a template bit to match the part to the template. When you release the vacuum, the template lets go with no marks on the part.
[1] (Amazon.com product link shortened)
See also: http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Template_Routing.html
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Yes, it works like that except with 30 cents worth of rubber bumpers. ;~)
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 4:36pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: I have a small project that I am working on that requires 28 small shelf support brackets that need to be identical. <snip> The rubber bumpers provide just the right amount of "friction/stick to the blanks to keep them from slipping <snip>
Pictures "are" worth a buncha words. Well, might well work, but usually the pieces I rout out are much more complex shapes. And sometimes smaller. I don't think I'd want to trust that the pieces would stay perfectly aligned.
Or am I missing something? If there Is a "stickiness", then I could see it working for me, but if not, not. By "stickiness" I mean if you lift one piece, the other will go along. Wouldn't need to be a serious stick.
Hmm, while thinking on that, occurred to me that clear silicone caulk all around the master might provide the needed "stickiness" after it's cured.
Looks like I'll be making some 2-D chess sets (just the outlines of the pieces on flat stock). I'd been planning on making enough masters to make one complete side at one go. Tha'd be faster, and easier, for me than swapping masters back and forth. A system like this could be a huge help, if I have trust in it not slipping.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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(Leon)

In the summer the piece might lift other wise it is like sicone caulk, lots of grip. Think of a rubber bath mat. Same principal.

LOL. Exactly

I needed 28 pieces but as always I made 4 extra for slippage possibilities. None slipped but I did get 3 that failed on the ends from tear out.
Practice on some trial pieces. I suspect the more rubber bumpers the better the hold. These are the 1/2" round by 1/8" thick adhesive backed ones.

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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 7:56pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: <snip> Practice on some trial pieces. I suspect the more rubber bumpersthe better the hold. These are the 1/2" round by 1/8" thick adhesive backed ones.
Interesting. I don't recall I've ever seen any, but I'll definitely check some out. I do not like double-stick tape at all, and am not enthused about screws holding the masters. I've been using small nails on the larger masters, which has worked well. With the smaller masters tho, the nails are very hard to pull out; but this may work for me. Great.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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(Leon)

Take a look here. http://wwhardware.com/catalog.cfm/ProductID/3MSJ5312
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Sat, Dec 9, 2006, 4:06am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) writeth: Take a look here. http://wwhardware.com/catalog.cfm/ProductID/3MSJ5312
I was right. Never seen any that I can recall. Printed it and will take it with me next time I get out. Definitely worth trying. Thanks.
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Leon (in mwgeh.8865$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net) said:
| If working with small pieces with | curves this pattern jig may be a little tougher to build. | I made the master piece and simply stuck some clear cabinet door | bumpers on to it and then set my blanks on top of the bumpers.
Sounds like a good idea. I usually build stops on the master to ensure exact registration of my workpiece; and if I think there might be slippage, I apply a strip of double-sided carpet tape to the master (masked so that there's more adhesive sticking to the master than to the workpiece). I pop the finished part off with a flat, skinny prybar and can use the same piece of tape for a couple of dozen parts.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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said:

I was considering building a jig with stops and for registration purposes however the pieces I was working with had square back corners. I stood them on the router table top on their flat edges side by side, and against the fence on the router table to register them to each other.
Additionally and as Swingman can attest to, when cutting the excess waste off at the BS beforehand I leave very little to be cut off with the router bit so there is little resistance. That said however I did do one with out cutting any waste out at all and every thing stayed in place.
These clear rubber door bumpers are similar to cured silicone caulk and are very grabby.
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Leon (in 0bkeh.26023$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr13.news.prodigy.net) said:
| These clear rubber door bumpers are similar to cured silicone caulk | and are very grabby.
Gotcha. I've got 'em on my shopping list already. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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said:

More specifically,
http://wwhardware.com/catalog.cfm/ProductID/3MSJ5312
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 8:46pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: I was considering building a jig with stops and for registration purposes however the pieces I was working with had square back corners. I stood them on the router table top on their flat edges side by side, and against the fence on the router table to register them to each other. <snip>
Like I told Morris. I'm just not getting a picture in my mind of this. Unless you're talking abou to check the finished pieces. That I could picture, but don't think it'd be neded, regardless of shape.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 2:09pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth sayeth: Sounds like a good idea. I usually build stops on the master to ensure exact registration of my workpiece; and if I think there might be slippage, I apply a strip of double-sided carpet tape to the master (masked so that there's more adhesive sticking to the master than to the workpiece). I pop the finished part off with a flat, skinny prybar and can use the same piece of tape for a couple of dozen parts.
I do not like double-stick tape at all, but never thought of masking it, that may change my mind.
Stops? On the master? I'm just not getting any pictures in my mind on this. Unless maybe you mean you would have a straight line, or two, on the finished piece. ??? I'm thinking this wouldn't work for me, because of the shapes of the pieces I usually do, but am curious.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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J T (in snipped-for-privacy@storefull-3337.bay.webtv.net) said:
| Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 2:09pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (Morris Dovey) | doth sayeth:
| Stops? On the master? I'm just not getting any pictures in my | mind on this. Unless maybe you mean you would have a straight | line, or two, on the finished piece. ??? I'm thinking this | wouldn't work for me, because of the shapes of the pieces I usually | do, but am curious.
If there's a straight line on the finished piece, the stop becomes a fixed fence attached to the master. When I can, I add a block or peg as a stop so that the workpiece can be positioned against the fence and slid up against the stop (registered) for repeatable positioning.
If there's no straight line on the finished piece, then it probably doesn't matter since there's probably a need to shape it all the way around. OTOH, if grain direction is important, then it might be useful to cut all the way around using a /pair/ of masters.
It all depends on the job <g>
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Sat, Dec 9, 2006, 2:15am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth elucidate: If there's a straight line on the finished piece, the stop becomes a fixed fence attached to the master. <snip> It all depends on the job <g>
Ah. The picture's there now. Not able to use it on current stuff, but maybe later. I'll have to ponder it. Thanks.
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