A rotten question...

Howdy,
Suppose a board is in a moist environment, and starts to rot.
The board is then moved to a different location that is sufficiently dry that the board would not have started to rot in the first place.
Would the rot continue (eventually consuming the board)?
Or would the situation stabilize leaving the rest of the board sound...?
Sincere thanks,
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Kenneth

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I don't know because when I removed the rotten board it ended up in the dumpster. They do make git rot kits where you inject something in to the wood to kill the rot making stuff. You then can cover it in epoxy to repair.

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snipped-for-privacy@SPAMLESSsoleassociates.com says...

YES, it would.
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wrote:

Hi Jim,
Perhaps you were trying to be funny, but if not...
Are you saying it would continue to rot, or would stabilize3 leaving the rest of the board sound?
Thanks,
--
Kenneth

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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 08:29:52 -0500, Kenneth

Ooops, that should have been "Hi KS"...
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Kenneth

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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 07:31:17 -0500, Kenneth
There's a margin where rot might not begin, but it will continue. If you're talking about housebuilding carpentry attached to a damp masonry wall, then this could be a problem for you. It also depends on the type of rot you have, and a little on the timber species.
If you're talking about storage damage on timber, then just saw it off and don't worry. You shouldn't be storing timber at anything like the humidity needed for rot to be an issue.
Largely though, any timber, including treated, will rot if the moisture conditions are right. You _must_ remove the moisture to stop this. Chemical rot treatment achieves little on rotten wood, it's mainly a way of putting a guard zone around on the good stuff. Fungal rots will propagate far better on the surface of masonry than on timber, even though these "threads" might not themselves be damaging.
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Smert' spamionam

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It will likely continue. The moist environment is not what is rotting the wood. It is what breeds in the moist environment that eats the wood. Remove the moisture and the rot may slow down but likely it will continue unless you kill the organisms that are eating away at the wood.
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Lack of moisture should kill them, no? I've cut the spalted section off a maple or birch log and used the rest without problems. You just need to make sure you got it far enough in, otherwise the stuff you can't see will have weakened the grain lines. I remember turning a leg out of birch that was a bit stained by the beginnings of rot. After I was done, I twisted it, and it came apart along the grain.
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Wood has moisture in it. Typically wood you work with has about 6%-8% moisture content.
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Yeah, but wood with a normal moisture content doesn't rot, so it stands to reason that whatever critters cause the wood to fall apart need more moisture than that.
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"mark" wrote in message

20% MC is considered the point which rot fungi need to flourish in certain types of untreated wood. Go here for more:
http://alsnetbiz.com/homeimprovement/woodrot.html
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Actually it will if the rot process has begun. Normal moisture content normally will not start the rot process but will sustain it once it has begun.
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 07:31:17 -0500, Kenneth

My guess would be that it would continue to rot...
Back when I was selling homes, if the pest control inspector found wood damaged by water, they would stop the source of the water (leaky eaves, plumbing leak, etc.), and then treat whatever wood that they didn't remove with something called "copper green"..
I don't know if that was a brand name or what...
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 15:24:50 +0000, mac davis wrote:

Copper sulfate: Old, reasonably effective anti-fungal treatment. Works on live plants, too.
Responding to an earlier post, just drying won't necessarily kill fungi. They're tenacious beasts. When conditions deteriorate (for them), they just spore up and wait it out.
Just to make things grimmer, they're eukaryotes; almost anything that'll kill them will be toxic to you, too. (Yeah, Micatin, but you don't want systemic exposure to it, either, sez my pharmacist.)
--
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So, if the conditions are permanently deteriorated -- i.e., you finish the wood, they're indefinitely suspended?
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http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/techline/ii-4.pdf
Basically, once it's below 20% MC, growth stops. The spores are everywhere, the mycelium dormant.

the
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