A Most Useful Tool....

Various threads just got me to thinking,
I have a fairly well equipped shop. But, there's one tool that I end up using increasing often, and that's the computer. (And I don't me CAD programs, either)
In everything from checking competitors prices on hardware, to tool reviews, to tracking down ingenious solutions to vexing problems, to just plain intriguing solutions to problems I didn't know existed, the computer/internet has become the first line of information and increased competence.
Norm Abram may have sparked a nationwide interest in home woodworking, but IMHO, the computer has served to reinforce that interest to even higher levels.
In fact, without being pugnacious, I can think of any number of tools that are much better than 35 years ago, in an evolutionary sense, but I can't quickly name a totally new, revolutionary tool. Wait a minute! Pneumatic nailers. I don't remember seeing any pneumatic nailer thirty five years, ago. (Certainly not in general use).
Except for the computer.
Just idle chatter...
James....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree... except a pneumatic nailer that plays up is certainly not faster than hand nailing when you have to un-jam every 1 in 5 nails :-) At least no more bruised thumbs... only nails imbedded in skull (see other thread) :-)
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 70 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Infinity Kitchen Making Router Bit Set - Jorgensen Cabinet Master Clamps - Sherwood Lathe Copy Attachment - Ryobi Right Angle Drill - Porter Cable COIL250 Coil Nailer - Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture & Cabinet Construction ------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are biscuits 35 years old? How old are ROS?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

local wookworkers store. They had it on closeout 'cuz they could not sell it! Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

40 years plus for bisquits, made serious inroads in the mid seventies. First Lamello, then Virutex, Elu, then Freud and an explosion from every body else.
Airpowered ROS 50 years, easy, My uncle used one making fibreglass molds for sailboats... No provisions for dust collection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In 1944 Hermann Steiner opened a carpenter's shop in Liestal. In the middle of the 50's, whilst looking for a simple means of joining the recently introduced chipboard, he invented almost by accident the now world-famous Lamello Joining System. In the succeeding years there followed further developments such as the circular saw and the first stationary biscuit (plate) joining machine in 1956 followed by the first portable biscuit joiner for Lamello grooves in 1968.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I suppose you could count it as "computer", but a spinoff of computer would be CNC machines.
How about laser tools? Cutters, guides (like those laser level thingies)? Plasma cutters? How long have biscuit joiners been around? Moisture meters?
No doubt these have all been around earlier than 35 years ago, but maybe not so easy to find. I dunno; more idle chatter.
- Owen -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip

The International Staple, Nail and Tool association (ISANTA) was formed in 1966, when a group of manufacturers saw the need for common action and standards of practice within the pneumatically-driven fastening systems industry. SENCO shared this vision and helped launch the organization.
Apparently the pneumatic nailers have been around since before 1966. Senco invented the nail gun and Senco is 50 years old.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J&KCopeland wrote:
snip

The Dewalt 621 plunge router comes to mind. Variable speed, single wrench bit change, built in dust collection, very fine height adjustment, extremely smooth plunge action ...
Precision positionable router table fence like the JoinTech.
Tite-Mark marking gauge and it's M&T wheels.
Diamond impregnated sharpening plates.
DIGITAL calipers with BIG numbers display.
Kreg Pocket Hole Jig, bit and screws.
Now if someone would come up with affordable, semi-quiet shaped charges for M&T and maybe for cutting waste from dovetail pins ...
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Jan 17, 2005, 3:52am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@kc.rr.com (J&KCopeland) claims: Various threads just got me to thinking, I have a fairly well equipped shop. But, there's one tool that I end up using increasing often, and that's the computer. <snip>
Well, if I was in business, might well be a computer. But, I ain't, and it ain't. I get along fine without a computer, and could survive without my WebTV.
Speaker magnet on a string, now that's handy.
JOAT Charity ain't giving people what you wants to give, it's giving people what they need to get. - Albert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.