7/32" Forstner Bit?

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I need to drill 7/32" holes within an eight inch of each other. With my normal bits Iget splintering in between the holes. A forstner bit would prevent this but my smallst is 1/4". Does anyone know if 7/32" forstner bits are available? A google search didn't show any results
Thanks
Ken
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Ken Johnsen wrote: > I need to drill 7/32" holes within an eight inch of each other. With my > normal bits Iget splintering in between the holes. A forstner bit would > prevent this but my smallst is 1/4". Does anyone know if 7/32" forstner bits > are available? A google search didn't show any results
Have you looked at and/or tested a brad point drill?
What kind of wood is splintering?
Lew
Lew
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I am using a brad point. I've been working with cherry.
Ken
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Ken Johnsen wrote:
> I am using a brad point. I've been working with cherry.
Couple of thoughts.
Can you turn the piece over and drill adjacent holes from alternate sides using a backer block?
Make sure drill is VERY sharp so it won't tear.
I'm out of ideas.
Lew
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Ken Johnsen wrote:

Where is the splintering? If it's tearing out on exit, well, a Forstner bit will do that, too. You have to back it with a sacrificial block or use a brad point bit and drill just until the point penetrates the other side, then turn the work over and finish the hole from there. The backer block is easier.
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I'm not drilling through the wood. I have 3/32 to 1/8" between holes. It's the top of the wood between the holes that is chipping and splintering
Ken
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Ken Johnsen wrote:

Ah, OK. Having never had that problem or drilled a series of holes so close together, I'll have to defer to someone else.
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Try a layer of tape pressed firmly on top of the work piece before drilling. I'd pull the tape off in a direction perpendicular to the grain.
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I don't know of a forstner bit that size.
How about clamping a sacrificial board on top and drilling thru both at the same time? This way the sacrificial board gets the tear out as it protects your project board.
Art
"Ken Johnsen" wrote in message ...

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but with the dimensions you need. You could then use a plunge router with a 7/32" bit to the drill the actual holes in the cherry. These bits are available from several sources according to Google and are in the $ 15.00 range. The advantage to the template would include zero clearance for the holes, reducing splintering.
Tin Woodsmn
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Ken a couple of suggestions:
1. If the piece your drilling the holes in is not part of something already and you're milling your lumber - leave it a tad thick, drill the holes, then plane to desired thickness.
2. Someone suggested tape and that may work but for holes that close together, I kinda doubt it will be 100%. What I have done is to apply some finish to the stock (shellac, poly, whatever) to help hold the fibers and then use a template (3/4" thick board, with hole/s in it clamped tightly to work piece).
3. Failing the above - just because the situation won't allow it, try dampening the wood with a damp sponge of water, or you could use mineral spirits too. This works when planing wood to reduce tearout due to grain changes and may work on this.
Bob S.
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Ken Johnsen wrote:

I see elsewhere you're using a brad point bit. 1. If it's a cheapie from the local Best Buy, get a good one to start with. (Amana's Timberline is one I've been pleased with). 2. Failing 1), sharpen the one you have. 3. _Then_ the tape trick may help a little but should be unneeded.
Regarding the other question, I think I have seen some Forstner's in 32nds, but don't have a direct source at hand.
Another possiblility would be to use a plunge router and a 2-flute (again, good quality) router bit.
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Ken Johnsen wrote:

spin the bit you have faster, feed slower and back out often to clear chips. and do all of this on the drill press with the wood clamped down. and make sure the bit is sharp.
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I don't know about the 7/32" forstners, but a good quality, _sharp_ brad point whoud do what you want.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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some real good advice here. Having had the same type problem with "pine" (white wood from local lumber yard) I have found that the best way to go is to cut the item over size an then mill to size after the holes are cut. drill holes at high speed with slow feed to insure as little tear out as possible. I resharpen my twist bits to a lower angle and that seems to help also. Brad point bits work well to keep the hole from wandering but mine seem to dull a lot faster then twist bits and I have more trouble sharpening them.

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Ken Johnsen wrote:

Ken
Get the best bit you can to drill the holes. Do some trial holes in scrap.
Use a sacfifical board as another suggested.
Drill the first hole and fill it with tight fitting dowel. Drill the second hole. Then punch out the dowel in the first hole.
Bob AZ
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Thanks for all the suggestions, a lot I never thought of. I'll give each a try to see what works best for me
Ken
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And what doesn't work...
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wrote in message

First try seemd to solve the problem. A new sharp brad point bit and increasing the speed of the drill press, eliminated the chip out between the holes
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