4"belt/6"disk sander recommendations? Also, HP/Amps again.

Hey all;
We're looking at (OK, we actually need! :-) one of those cute little 6"disk/ 4"belt sander combo units. There are three we're looking at here, Delta, Craftsman, and Ryobi. This shouldn't be rocket science here, as these aren't quite the precision tools like a planer or table saw. However, no sense in getting the WRONG one!
Any thoughts on these? Power ratings are as follows:
Sears: 1/2HP (2/3 Developed--I think they're required to give continuous in Canada, hence the 1/2) Delta: 1/3HP Ryobi: 4.3A
Based on the above (somewhat suspicious) numbers and also the weight of the machine, I'm inclined towards the Sears over the Delta; but I don't know how the Ryobi fits into the mix.
As an aside, I'd like to get the much beefier 4/8" Sears unit, but it's not available north of the 49th. :-(
Thanks for your opinions folks!
Colin (the neophyte)
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Check the amperage ratings of all three and use that for power comparisons. HP on consumer tools means almost nothing these days. It's usually either peak HP or some fantasy figure they came up with after running some numbers and power factor specs.
I personally would go with the Delta, even though all of these sanders are more or less generic imports. The Ryobi ones I've seen really have a terrible finish and Sears changes suppliers every couple years.
GTO(John)

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You want beefy? Harbor Freight / Central Machinery has a 6"x48" belt / 9" disc - 1 hp motor. $150 includes stand.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GTO69RA4) wrote in message

I would, except that there aren't any on the sears or the delta! The Ryobi is the only one that has anything other than horsepower.

Yeah, the Ryobi looked pretty rough--it's exactly the same as the old Ridgid one, before the Ridgid changeover. Since posting though, I've seen quite a few places where people talk about the Delta bogging down. Hmmm...
Colin
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Colin Bigam wrote:

I just picked up a Delta at a garbage sale a few months ago...boy do I wish I had bought one of these earler! It's great!
disclaimer: I have nothing to compare it to, since it's my first stationary sander.
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On 7 Nov 2003 15:47:14 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@go.com (Colin Bigam) wrote:

well the disc is about worthless. way to small to do much. you maybe can use 1" of it. the belt part is ok. I beat hell out of a delta and it is still going. but really anything less then 12" disc 6" belt is pretty limited. belts/discs don't last long and the setup is not very accurate.
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Still gloating on the JET, eh Steve?
Did you notice the new 6x9 breed at ~300? Looks like a much better table than the pin and tin on the 4x6, and might be a better value than the benchtop types for that reason.
(Colin Bigam) wrote:

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(G) the 6x9 would not be bad but less then a 12" DISC is a bit small for a lot of use. hell 12" does not let you use much really.
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I had one of those cute little outfits. They are fine for hobby stuff but very under powered. Go to the 6"x48" Delta. You will be much happier in the long run. GT
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Fishn2much wrote:

Agree. Mine is going south after about three years, and I'm not going to fix it. When it dies, I'll get a bigger one, or probably just do without since I'm turning into a Neander, and a planed surface looks better anyway. The only thing I've used it for in the last few months is grinding plane irons and chisels, for which it works, but isn't really ideal.
These things are fine for little stuff, but they're just not big enough for projects of any size, and the anemic motor is very, very easy to choke. I can bring it to a screeching halt with a 1/4" chisel without pressing hard at all.
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You just need th touch. I used to use mine to grind my steel in making plane irons. I flattened a lot of planes on it. I flattened 65 infills sides on it and did a lot of other work. the bearing scream at me but it is still going. my jet 6x48 has ground thousands of plane irons without a hiccup.
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Steve Knight wrote:

Mine's one of the 4" x 36" deals with a 1/3 HP motor. I say it's "not ideal" because people more typically use one of the 1" x 41" (?) for this, because the longer belt provides more cooling time (I've heard... I don't have one...) With the 36" belt I have to be really careful not to burn the steel.
Sure beats hand grinding though. I started off going through two packs of 60 grit every time I needed to make a large angle change. Now I have an auxillary table screwed to the side of the platten, so I can use the same guide for both grinding and honing without taking the item out. Working out great so far.
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the longer the belt the less heat and the belt lasts far longer. I sure saw a difference going for the 4x36 to the 6x48. I even get more life on my 6x89 Plus the 689 can be run at twice the rpms with less heat then the 6x48 what I want for steel work is a 2x72 knife grinding setup. but they are spendy.
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snipped-for-privacy@go.com (Colin Bigam) wrote in message

I have had the Ryobi for a couple of months. I love it. It's twice the machine the Delta is for about $10 less.
It is plenty powerful for the sort of work a machine its size can handle. It is also quite heavy so it stays put on the bench. If I were running a commercial shop I would love to have a bigger machine, but this one works just fine and has greatly inproved my rate of productionon the adirondack chairs that I am constantly building.
Dick Durbin Tallahassee
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