22 volt power to shop ?most used plug?

I'm doing home renovations downstair, and decided that at the same time I would bring 220 volt power to the shop (by doing it now I save the cost of a repeat electrical inspection). My shop isn't ready for that yet but I hope to build a woodworking shop over the next few years. I've already wired in #6/3 loomex wire to a 70 amp subpanel on a 50 amp feeder fuse, just so I don't have to worry about being underserviced later. 120 volt service is excellent already.
Not yet having the tools to compare plug configuration, I am a little unsure which 220 volt plug would get the most general use. Early candidates for 220 volt service would be a planer, 8" jointer, maybe a dust system. Would it be reasonable to wire in a small 20 amp plug, with the expectation that I would use that one the most? Ideally I should wait until I get the device before completing the wiring, but I fear that the electrical inspector will not approve the new wiring job unless there is at least one circuit completed.
Dave
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I think twist lock plugs work best. They don't tend to "walk" out of the socket.
This gives you better reliability. IMHO Frank
Dave wrote:

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Twist lock plugs are great. The only caveat is that if you use them anywhere, you will want them everywhere. In my shop I use a lot of the duplex 110/220 outlets. I realize they are not code everywhere. I find this setup handy. Virtually all my stationary tools are 220. They're mostly on casters so I do move them around (except the table saw). Sometimes I run on extension cords. Twist lock would be handy with the extension cords because one does sometimes tend to pull on them.
bob g.
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Is the new sub-panel in the area that will be your shop? If so, I think you are finished for now. There is no reason an inspector would require the installation of a 220v circuit to approve the job. Later you will want to locate 220v outlets near the equipment. Unless you already have your shop layout designed you won't know where to put them.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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It's four feet away from where the plug(s) would be. Then again, the system is versatile enough that changing it would be easy. I just want it inspected and passed so I don't have to pay for another inspection later. Am I hearing that there are so many different plug configurations that guessing would be useless?
Dave

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If you think the inspector will object, just put in a 115v duplex circuit. You will want some of those anyway and there will be no plug choice needed.
Yes, there are lots of 220v plug designs. Some equipment that must run on 220v will come with a plug installed. Most won't. And all equipment that can be wired 115v or 220v will come pre-wired 115v. You can just choose a 220v plug now if you like but there is no need to and you might end up cutting and tossing a factory plug. You must choose a breaker size before selecting a plug. You going 20 or 30?
There have been many threads on this over the years, so DAGS using "220 plugs" to see what others have used.
G'luck -- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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Dave,
Just call them and ask. The staff in the department are more than capable of answering questions like that over the phone, let alone at their service counters.
Pat
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 15:13:19 GMT, "Dave"

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In broad, there are two _types_ of plugs used for 220V. the ones with the straight blades that you just push/pull to connect/disconnect, and the ones with 'L'-shaped curved blades, set in a circle -- called twist-lock connectors.
Within each type, they come with different (read 'incompatible') sizes and orientations of the blades, depending on the power-handling requirements.
*AND* there is the secondary question of whether or not the plug provides for passing the 'neutral' connection, as well as 'ground'. An issue/concern only if the device has some 110V-powered component, in addition to the 220V one.
Thus, the 'spectrum' includes 3-wire/4-wire, straight/twist-lok, and something like half-a-dozen possible power-rating levels. Which makes for TWENTY-FOUR possible plug/socket types to choose from.
Basically there are only a couple of requirements, in making a selection. 1) it has to be rated for the power level you'll be pulling through it. 2) it has to match that which will be plugged into it. (changing plugs on the corded thing _is_ allowed. ;)
Unless you're dealing with seriously heavy-duty machinery (e.g. _honest_ 5HP motors) a 20A plug will probably be adequate for most machinery. Although a true 3HP cabinet-saw will likely need something bigger.
Comment: plugs/sockets are relatively _inexpensive_. 10 ga wire is adequate for anything 'rational' -- well, short of a big arc-welder. <grin> If you just need 'something to show', pull 10ga wire, put in a 20A breaker, and a straight-blade 20A socket. changing the socket and/or the breaker at a later date is 'trivial'; the wiring is good for 30A..
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If you do a Google search on "NEMA" and "plugs" or "configurations", you'll find lots of pictures of the different types of plugs.
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 14:12:40 GMT, "Dave"

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Best reference I've found is http://www.quail.com/nema.cfm
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