Which Biscuit Jointer?

I am about to buy a biscuit jointer and wondered if anyone had any experience of these two?
http://tinyurl.com/3xryl http://tinyurl.com/yq8yg
I would just go for the Makita as all their other tools i have seem to be brilliant...
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On 4 Feb 2004 05:28:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (Reader) wrote:

Of the two I would go for the Makita. I've used one and found it pretty good. It has been reviewed well in the woodworking magazines.
There are several factors in a biscuit jointer that are important, but IMO the plunge action, the fence setting accuracy and the anti-slide arrangement are the most important.
I had a DeWalt for a while, but ultimately returned it because the fence setting was innaccurate - design defect.
If you use biscuit jointing a fair bit then the Lamello Classic is even better at about 220. Lamello invented the technology and their machines are really nice.
I have one of their TOP20 machines which has numerous additional capabilities - for example blade height adjustment. It's a real pleasure to use - absolutely bang on accurate and mechanism as smooth as silk.
I've always had good success with Makita products such as drills and I have one of their sliding mitre saws also a nice product to use.
.andy
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On 4 Feb 2004 05:28:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (Reader) wrote:

I haven't used a brand-named biscuit jointer, but I bought and have used the 35 version available from Screwfix - the brand names can be 10 times as expensive.
I suppose my lack of experience with other jointers gives me less clout in terms of recommendations, obviously, but I have to say that the Screwfix jointer does the business for me.
PoP
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(Reader) wrote:

et moi aussi
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I found the screwfix one so good, I can't imagine what extra you get for all the extra cash.
One problem I did find, was that it works much better, for doing a large number of cuts non stop, if you put a vac onto the machine to suck the bits out the cut.

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wrote:

Possibly not, but there is. It really depends on the type of work that you want to do, the materials and the accuracy that you want to achieve.
If you tried one of the Lamello, Porter Cable or Makita machines on accurate work, you would notice the difference.
Some of the aspects are similar to those of a router, but while I feel that a sub 100 1/2" router is generically worthless, I think that you can get worthwhile results for a lot of jobs from a sub 100 biscuit jointer.

.andy
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wrote:

That was really my take as well. I guess one day I will find out, but until then I'm a happy bunny having spent 35 for something that gets used occasionally, leaving money in the kitty to buy other tools.
PoP
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On 4 Feb 2004 05:28:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (Reader) wrote:

I don't know what other tools you've got in your collection but I use a biscuit joiner attachment for my router. A lot cheaper and takes up less space.
One of these in fact... http://tinyurl.com/28t76 ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Lurch wrote:

Yup - tried that - but I found it is just not the same as the real thing. There are several pitfalls using the router cutter I found:
1) The biggest limitation is that the diameter of the cutter is too small to cut the right size rebate for the biscuit in one hit. Hence you have plunge into the work and then slide the router to elongate the slot to the right size for the biscuit which is a bit hit and miss compared to the ability to set the biscuit size on the dial and then "plunge in" and "move on" like you can with the jointer.
2) The elongated slot cut with a router has a flat back to it which does not match the profile of the biscuit - so you don't get the joint as well located.
3) You are more likely to damage the work because you always have to remember that the cutter is exposed - hence you need to position the router ready to be slid into the edge of the work making sure that you do not try and pass through anything solid on the way to the starting position! (not a problem if used on a table rather than hand-held however)
4) Using the router is slower (because of above)
5) Accuracy is poorer with the router cutter - the fence design on a jointer makes it simple to get opposing biscuit cuts in perfect alignment - draw a pencil line across the joint where you want a biscuit - then line it up with the centre mark on the jointer fence and plunge once - repeat the other side - perfectly matched and aligned cuts.
Hence because of above I bought one of the cheapie Ferm ones. The first one went back because when you locked the fence at the require depth it pulled itself a little bit non square - hence you got biscuit slots at a slight angle (approx 0.5mm lower at one end than the other). The replacement seems much better although the switch design can be a bit sticky! As other have said the use of dust extraction is very worth while.
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Thu, 05 Feb 2004 13:57:38 +0000, John Rumm

True, if I used biscuits more often then I'd go for a seperate machine.

Never really thought of that. I don't find it a real problem though, as long as the biscuit fits, it'll hold when the glue dries!

True, see response to 1)

I haven't had a problem with lining up biscuit slots.

That's one reason I haven't bought a seperate cutter, if I'm going to buy one I would rather spend the money on a decent machine. Personally I quite like Makita stuff, I've got a van and a garage full of the stuff with the odd DeWalt thrown in here and there! It was just a thought, obviously not particularly applicable in this instance. ;-) ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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