What is an SDS Drill

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I have some holes to drill into concrete lintels. Can anyone please tell me how an SDS Drill is different to a normal Masonary drill? Does SDS refer to the hammer action or the just the drill bit?
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me
to
(S)lotted (D)rive (S)ystem
bit gets battered much better
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Chris Oates wrote:

Or not. Spannung Durch System (Special Direct System).
--
Grunff

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Your average "home" drill has a hammer setting which is a bit like a device for drilling holes in puff pastry. An SDS drill has a serious mechanical design that wallops the drill bit into the brickwork.
I was converted to SDS several months ago, having used a B&Q 650W drill for my holes in walls for many years. I bought a cheap SDS drill, pointed it at the wall (which had some hard bricks in it) and a couple of seconds later I had the holes I wanted.
You'll never use a regular home drill again for bashing holes in walls.
PoP
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I have to agree. I had a Bosch hammer drill, and it failed after 12 months. Bosch repaired it, and it lasted another six months or so. Then I went and bought an SDS drill from Wickes. I've used it on stone, engineering brick and quarry tiles (proper inch thick ones, not the pansy ones you get these days). I've also used it as a concrete breaker.
John
--
John Rouse

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It may be worth noting that you also get SDS Max drills. Typically these are the larger drill sizes and will not fit into a standard SDS chuck.
writes

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The 240v stuff can be had cheaply these days. They work on pneumatic pressure (I think) with the motor powering a piston. Ordinary drills use a ratchet system.
Prices start at about 25 quid. You can even get battery versions start price is about 85.
I have no idea of their quality.
Bear in mind that most modern housing uses high insulation stuff these days and that aero block is best drilled with a low power drill using ordinary wood bits. For brown plugs use a bit just a little narrower than the plug. Drill as deep as possible without the hammer action and just hammer the fixing in.
A bit OT but I thought a little caution worth mentioning.
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Unfortunately the same happened with by Bosch SDS drill after it's first repair. An old PB240 which isn't available any more. Fabulous action but probably totally worn out by a life of misuse. Bought a DeWalt 566 which whirrs away like a Scalextric toy and sort of does the job but nowhere near as effectively as the old Bosch.
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Are you trying to drill something outside its stated capacity? I've found the 566 makes light work of anything I've drilled. If using it to break up concrete etc a heavier/more powerful device would probably be better, but a chore to use for normal drilling, etc.
--
*I must always remember that I'm unique, just like everyone else. *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Don't think so. It does the job, just makes a bit more of a chore of it than the old Bosch. I think now these things come in 2kg and 4kg weights whereas the old Bosch was just under 3kg.
But sound and smell of the DeWalt motor makes me cringe that this is supposed to be as good as it gets nowadays.
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PoP wrote:

Does an SDS get round the problem of the bit being deflected by very hard pieces of aggregate (especially on, or just below, the surface) in concrete "breeze" blocks as happens with an ordinary hammer drill so you end up with the hole in the wrong place and a slot rather than a nice round hole in the surface plaster/plasterboard?

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It can still be affected by that, but I've found is less prone to do so - especially if you drill a small hole first (say 5mm).
The SDS drill bit is being "punched" into the hole, whereas a regular hammer drill is just adding a bit of vibration and creating a noise to make you feel it is actually doing something useful (it is - it is creating extra sales for regular hammer drill sales because it knackers the drill).
PoP
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One thing I really can't get used to with the SDS drill is that the less you lean on it the faster it goes in. Hot knife and butter are the words that spring to mind for most jobs - even concrete.
John
--
John Rouse

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Oh I think that's a tad unfair on hammer drills! Have to say I've never actually used an SDS (one of these days; it's on my wishlist!) but have you never found yourself using a hammer drill, wondering why the hell it isn't working, then finding the hammer action disengaged? The difference is massive.
David
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Woolies 29.99 5 year warranty for a tryout

Not as massive as the leap to an SDS you can knock down walls with them can you remove tiles with a hammer drill ? No
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Try drilling something like a concrete lintel. A hammer drill will make lots of noise, but little progress. An SDS will go straight through. A hammer drill is ok for most household bricks etc, but useless for anything harder. You really have to try an SDS to be totally converted.
--
*The closest I ever got to a 4.0 in school was my blood alcohol content*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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London SW 12

...mmmm - but it's not the fact that it's an SDS drill that makes the difference - that just describes how the bit is held. It's the fact that the impact / percussion process is better designed on the professional drills - often using an air piston driven by a crank. The cylinder surrounding the piston is free to move up and down and it is that that causes the impact. (Says he who has pulled a few Hiltis apart when they've died !)
Andrew Mawson
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Andrew Mawson wrote:

No, the whole point od the slotted bit holder is that rather than holding the bit in a chuck and hammering the chuck, you hammer the bit directly. With the first setup, the impact you can impart to the bit is limited by how strongly the chuck can hold the bit. With SDS the impact isn't limited because the bit is hammered directly.
--
Grunff

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But the SDS part is integral to the performance overall - a normal chuck would simply slip slightly.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Only slighlty.

Which is why you might think it unfair.

Yes.
And still found it took for ever to drill a few holes anyway.
Use an SDS, the difference truly is massive
--
Chris French, Leeds

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