Savaplug

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Better still, we could install 6 conditioners on the flex. Then we would save 120%. The fridge would, in effect, be producing electricity that we could use round the house, like running a few fan heaters.
Christian.
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No, you need to wrap a hydraulic magnet conitioner around the flex.
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even
of
I'll have to run out and get one or two.
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Hi
I probably still have one somewhere that failed safety test. I always wondered what it did. Inside there's a triac and some discrete control circuitry - no ICs or anything.
My best guess based on this, and it is a total guess, is that it might supply full power at start up, then trim some off the leading edges off the waveform once the motor was upto speed. But.. its only guessing.
Centre for Alternative Technology (C.A.T.) sell them for around 20, but when I contacted them got no info back, so I was rather sceptical.
Regards, NT
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On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 14:18:42 GMT, Clive Summerfield wrote:

That does seem to be the general idea looking at several sites (generally a word for word repeat of the manufacturer's blurb). I don't know much about pumps, but surely the pump only draws the power needed to keep it running? There is an Estates Review page that favourably covers their use by Redbridge Borough Council on http://domain258282.sites.fasthosts.com/pages/news/junjul02/008.htm
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On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 16:59:20 +0100, John Armstrong

No, that is basically the problem.
Look at a workshop compressor. Any modern one will have an "unloader valve" (You can hear this hiss whenever the compressor motor cuts out). The function of the unloader is to empty the compressor cylinder of compressed air, so that next time it starts up it's pumping into a low pressure, rather than trying to start against an already full cylinder. As it is, workshop compressors pull a huge current at startup and running one without an unloader would pop the fuse on a domestic supply.
Fridges (of any sort) don't have such valves. There's a natural reluctance to add any such potential leaky valve to a sealed regrigerant system. So when a fridge compressor starts, it's pumping into a high load. Such a compressor motor must thus be rated for its starting power, which is over-rating it for the running power.
The Savaplug reduces motor power electrically, after a small delay from first starting. It's a good idea, although the original plugs were far from cheap. It's also an idea that's easy to build inside a new fridge, and my understanding is that many of them now do so.
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Yup. It's essentially a delayed-start dimmer module. The same thing is used on industrial fans which need to be speed controlled. They might be full of kitchen grease or whatever, so the speed control gives full power for a few seconds to get 'em going, then reduces the mains waveform to give the lower-than-maximum running speed. The savaplug just has a preset amount of 'dimming' compromised between working on *most* appliances, and saving electricity.
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I've just had to replace the control pcb module on my 18 month old freezer, the circuit board had quite a few integrated circuits on it (and cost 53!). I assume it has some sort of control like this built in & I wondered if using something like a Savaplug would actually do more harm than good if used in conjunction with it ?
Nick
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Snap! Wasn't a Bosch by any chance?
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writes

freezer,
No, mine is a Servis. The fault originally started when it was about 3 weeks out of guarantee, symptoms were the compressor running for longer than usual and it was getting far too cold - about minus 35-40 C. Initially it could be made to work as normal for a few days by repeatedly pressing the fast freeze button, but eventually it got to the stage the compressor was running continuously. I thought 53 quid for a pcb was bad so I phoned around - only one other place had them and wanted 93 for the same part.
Nick
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I use a timer plug set to go on and off every 15 minutes for 15 minutes and off for a bit longer over night. This lets the temp inside the freezer even out between compressor run cycles and has saved about 30% per week so far with no reall effect on temp in the freezer. I live alone so don't open the door much any way. I have verified the savings by using a plug that tells you how much power is being used. and a thermometer to make sure the freezer stayed okay. I think there is usually a large over run before the thermostate rcognises that the freezer is already cold enough. by cycling the power on and off you cut short a lot of these over runs.
Cost was about 5 for the timer socket. :o)
IMM wrote:

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