Running cables through stud walls

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I've had hit and miss luck with nogginses. Dropped aerial cables, lighting cables, even plastic conduit down full runs of the studs in both upstairs and down in my place. Got away with it - no nogginses present (all lath & plaster or ex-l&p-studwork-with-HA-developers-plasterboard-in-its-place).
Then, as you would put it, the minor deities S&M put me back in my place.
I was relocating my light switch to the other side of the door. All cables run - last job is cut hole in L&P wall and pull up the final stretch of cable, install switch.
Normally adding a socket or switch in L&P is a 5 minute job - pick a location, make sure not on top of a stud, mark round dry lining box, drill two holes in opposite corners, zip round with jigsaw, insert dry lining box, wire up, done.
This time, I selected position at switch height (to match every other switch in house, not the new low bregs position) slap bang in between the studs. Nice deep dry lining box (45mm seems to be ideal for L&P). Started cutting round the marked perimiter, and encountered surprising resistance from the laths. Fine, I thought, just a bit springy because they're near the edge of the door frame. Bugger me, when I remove the plaster and laths, I've sawn 2/3rds way through a noggin on both sides of the box. Arse. Still, worked out better in a way because I was able to screw a nice shallow steel back box onto the noggin, plaster it all in, and it was the perfect depth and a lot more rigid than a dry lining box.
The impressive thing was that the jigsaw cut straight through it, albeit with a little more resistance than expected. Didn't bend the blade or anything (was using a full depth deWalt blade in it). Atlas Copco BXPE100XL or whatever it's called. Lovely tool.....
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

Minor?
That's your problem! "Sod" - after tens of thousands of invocations of "Oh - Sod it!" across the world is no longer minor deity - your lack of appropriate reverence is no doubt at the root of a displeased deity delivering due chastisement.
So let it be.
(in theological mood having been reading Exodus 22:2-3 and considering its application to home security systems ...)
Barley Twist (Please put out the cats to reply direct)
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Yes, I agree, if I had wood to chop, or rafts to build, or otherwise got stuck in the wilderness and needed to construct a large wooden damn to feed my hydroelectric power project then I would be sad to blunt the saw blade... but this has never happened to me... not even that time I dozed off in an armchair watching McGuyver!
So, for all those out there like me, that have never used the saw on yoru swiss army knife, then I can recommend it as an EXCELLENT backbox cut-out generating tool...
Besides, when things get tought, the tough get there Gerber Multi-tool off their belt and select the tungsten carbide jigsaw blade, making the swiss army knife saw redundant... ;-)
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Paul <paul at javajedi dot com> wrote:

Ah - current day. I'm stuck in Victoriana where the ceilings are rather higher. And as well as noggins you get 45 degree runs as well - I've no idea what those are called.
But a modern house should have the humidity rather better controlled than one my age when it was built, so perhaps the studs wouldn't move around so much. ;-)
--
*Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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