Router recommendation

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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 11:09:39 +0100, PoP

Damn straight!
Is it just me or has anyone else noticed the need for tools to free tools (and other things) from the packing lately? Bloomin daft arrangement that seems! Surely it's not beyond the wit of man to arrange things in such a way that robust packaging does not, by default, also mean inpenetrable and land-fill hogging?
Never thought I'd see it this way, but I am starting to see where those slightly eccentric folks, who leave their packaging in the store at the time of purchase, are coming from!
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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wrote:

The packaging I really, really hate is when an object is encapsulated in that thin plastic which is quite robust. A knife hardly dents it, scissors struggle, and if you aren't careful you try to rip it apart with your fingers and tear lumps out of your flesh with the very sharp edges.
Someone was saying about a safe on this forum yesterday. I reckon a cheaper option might be to sell a piece of kit which can wrap some of this hard plastic around your cash - then you can leave it on show knowing full well the thief won't be able to get at it without leaving some DNA behind..... ;)
PoP
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On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 08:15:18 +0100, PoP

LOL! ;O)
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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PoP wrote:

Must admit I looked at that one - glad I rejected it now ;-)
(I noted that the minimum speed was something like 15K RPM - far to fast for safe use of a big cutter like a panel raising bit).
The Freud goes down to 8K RPM and also has a feedback speed control - so that it maintains the selected RPM under load.
The plunge lock is very effective and the height adjustment is easy to use as well. The only fault I can find (if you can call it that) is the base plate liner is just made from plastic rather than the better material (the name of which I forget) used to line the base of the trend.
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:20:47 +0100, PoP

Well, well, well.......
Took a walk thru the local town centre this morning. Passing by one of those stack-em-high sell-em-cheap shops run by the local Indian or Pakastini community (no offence intended - the shop is absolutely fine - they sell a lot of useful DIY tools at very good prices).
They had a section in the window showing power tools. Stopped to take a look, and there's the B&Q PPro router on display - for 34.99.
Different colour. And there's is labelled as 1200W - which is much closer to the torque I experienced with the B&Q jobbie (labelled at 2050W). But physically, absolutely identical in every way. Badged by Rolson:
http://www.rolsontools.com/index.htm
That router isn't shown on their web site, but it was definitely badged as Rolson.
That Rolson router wouldn't be a bad buy for 34.99 for a mid-range router. But not the 98.98 advertised by B&Q for a heavy duty router.
Beware!
PoP
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 12:06:34 +0100, PoP

How do you know ? Those lookalike tools hide a huge variation on internal componentry. Take an AEG (the best), a Freud (adequate) and a Draper (crap) router apart sometime and compare the innards. Yet the external case is identical.
-- Smert' spamionam
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 14:46:33 +0100, Andy Dingley

Physically the same for sure. Things like the fence - identical. The dust extract - identical. Body shape - identical.
The 34.99 one had a 12mm collet. The B&Q variety was half inch. And so on.
Obviously the internals might be a tad different. But as I said previously, the B&Q version was most definitely not performing as a 2000W router should (I have several years experience of different routers).
PoP
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And that doesn't indicate why it was cheap? Seen any 12mm shank router bits around have you?
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 17:16:40 +0100, Peter Ashby

Gordon Bennett. What's happened to the folks round these parts? You try and help with possibly useful information and you get kicked in the ghoulies for your trouble.
Thank you for your helpful comment. I shan't bother next time.
PoP
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 16:34:18 +0100, PoP

Really 12mm or 12.7mm ? 8mm collets are bad enough, and I always threw 6mm cutters away, in case they ever got used by accident. 12mm sounds crazy enough that they might have made one, as a cutter tie-in, but it surely can't be a good idea to buy one.
-- Smert' spamionam
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Oh they're out there. [1] I have a router supplied with a 12mm & 1/2" collet plus inserts to reduce to 8, 6 & 1/4" Despite what may seem intuitive the metric inserts fit the 1/2" collet, rather than keeping the metric and imperial sizes paired. Does anybody sell a 12mm shanked bit in the UK? Not that I want one, quite happy with 1/2"
[1] Was prefitted with the 12mm collet - cue swearing - until I noticed the 'spare' was 1/2" (12.7mm)
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Oh they're out there. [1] I have a router supplied with a 12mm & 1/2" collet plus inserts to reduce to 8, 6 & 1/4" Despite what may seem intuitive the metric inserts fit the 1/2" collet, rather than keeping the metric and imperial sizes paired. Does anybody sell a 12mm shanked bit in the UK? Not that I want one, quite happy with 1/2"
[1] Was prefitted with the 12mm collet - cue swearing - until I noticed the 'spare' was 1/2" (12.7mm)
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 21:08:33 +0100, Andy Dingley

I thought it was 12mm.
Anyway, how difficult would it be to get a half inch collet replacement I wonder? The B&Q machine had such a beast to fit into the same physical chuck.
PoP
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On Thu, 02 Oct 2003 06:48:30 +0100, PoP

I forget who, but there's a collet seller out there (Marcel posted the link here a while back) who has a magic list of nearly every machine and does something to fit.
The DeWalt machine with dust extract up one pillar is a nice machine, but the UK version is 1/4" only. When you fit the 1/2" collet (supplied as standard in the USA) it becomes a lot more useful.
-- Smert' spamionam
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wrote:

Yes, I have this machine (DW621K) and it's really good to use (excepting the plunge sticking problem that Gnube alerted me to...).
Lack of 1/2" collet in the UK market has always irked me - I'd much rather be building up a collection of 1/2" cutters. They reckon they can't get CE approval for the machine with a 1/2" collar here. However, seeing some of the low end routers with 1/2" collets I find that difficult to believe....
Trip to the States looms this month though - if I can get anywhere near a DW Service Centre I'll pick one up.
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

See my other post on this, they told me they intended to fix it, and I got the impression this would be either by doing a retro cure or a recall, you'll need to get on to their tech to find out which. Mine was a model 615, and I'm sorry to hear you found the defect on your model too, I'd not realized you'd found it as well. Best of luck. Still miss mine for all that!
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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the
TBH, now that I know what circumstance causes the sticking (thanks for the analysis!) , I've modified my behaviour so that it doesn't happen any more. It's fairly intuitive fortunately because it involves plunging by applying pressure with the same hand that I release the plunge lock with.
Agree with you that it shouldn't happen for this level of tool (and whatever the rest of their products are like, I still reckon that DW make decent routers).
Will contact tech dept and see what they say....
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

Isn't it strange that we measure our wood and materials in mm and metres, and yet we can't figure out how to make the switch from imperial chucks/collets to decimal?
PoP
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PoP wrote:

It begs the question: why bother? it is not like a metric cutter will do the job any better. Also remember that lots of router and cutter makers want to sell into the US market, so metric is not going to help them there.
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 01:12:29 +0100, John Rumm

Yes, but my new fangled metric tape measure doesn't measure materials any better than my trusty imperial tape measure either ;)
I'm slowly moving over to metric measurement. It isn't unusual for me to say to someone "that will require about an inch of material", and then happily measure and cut 25mm......or vice-versa.
I can visualise 1/8th of an inch a lot better than I can 3mm.
PoP
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