Replacement Bargeboards-Soffits

Hi all. I own a 1974 brick built bungalow with traditional redwood barge boards and plywood soffits. Water is running down the harled/roughcast walls and the paint has peeled off the horizontal facias in addition the soffits have delaminated and in two places have holes fist sized. I intend to replace the soffits and barge boards in plastic myself. I am getting 40% discount on my plastic on published prices for a net cost of 1000 inc VAT % discount for 40 metre run. Does this sound OK including Klober edging?. Is the water on the wall a result of the roofing felt failing?. Will I get away with pushing zinc sheet-DPC or even better material under the first layer of tiles-gently sloping Marley?. Do I start on the gable and work round ?. All advice gratefully appreciated. Tom
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I get the guttering cleaned and cleared and try to keep them that way. If water is running down the walls from the roof, then there is almost certainly something wrong with it. But this is more than likely to be your guttering that is overflowing because it's choked with debris.
As for pricing of the new materials, I'm sorry I'm not up on these types of thing because I haven't needed to use them for many years. We've always used treated timber to re-new soffits and barge boards on any of our properties.
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Gutters are clear of leaves etc. I would like to replace with wood but Im disabled so my days of running up ladders are over. Potential buyers like plastic Im afraid everybody is into nil maintenance it seems. Tom

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I think that the wood and ply has done its fair share without too much complaint and probably no maintenance for a fair while hasn't it?
Do you really think that replacing it with ugly plastic a fair estimate of the value of the 30 years service received?

I hope your roof timbers are fine. I would get up in the roof space with an halogen if I were you. Then phone rentokil for a free survey; if they still do them.
Modern housing will have treated timber especially if trusses are used. I rather think your house has a ordinary rafters. Don't lose heart if it turns out they are and that there is rot in them. It's a fairly big job but not out of reach of a couple of DIYers. Even inexperienced ones if they are fit and willing.
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boards and

Amen to that.
The front above the windows is finished in cedar profile its not been touched since 1974 and it looks great!!! I would really like to do the facia s in cedar-but-I am unable to source it in Scotland-Ive had plenty quotes of 1000 up for the timber-but-no firm details.

Problem is plastic is soooooooo. easy to install I watched the travelling man put up facings next door in 4 very slow working days with only a ladder--deadly-they think they ve got replacement-but-no timber came off-needless to say all work was done when they were off site!.

I ll be up there in the morning!!.

Yup it has untreated factory made metal stapled trusses. However the general standard of build is belt and braces-it is a self build.
Don't lose heart if it

Im disabled but I ve built 2 wooden garages so Im not averse to getting stuck in.

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Those factory made trusses probably had a dipping in paraffin based (clear) preservative. It turns resinous on drying and gives a seriously timeproof protection. The cedar is similar with a naturally occurring resin. Red pine has it too but unevenly. White pine has none and it is difficult to treat without pressure.
Since the roof may be OK, you may be able to do the rest quite easily yourself.
If you want to go for 60 years this time: Get pressure treated timber from a timberyard. It costs pennies more than untreated. If you can find cedar by special order usually, use that but it will cost about as much as plastic. Personally I'd just use standard timber and use preservative as the first coat. (Do all your cuts, paint with presevative, then leave it dry for a couple of days and paint it then fix it. That's where the DIYer wins out over employing someone to do it.)
Good luck.
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Hi Tom, haven't got a clue on this, sorry.

Hi Tom,
Almost certainly the felt has perished. If the problem is localised and not all the way along the walls then it is definite. And for you to have this much water probably means there is a defect with the tiles so this needs checking when it's raining. Another possibility is condensation running down the underside of the felt into the fascia/soffit void - you need to check this in the loft on a really cold day.
Two things you need to do. If you can push a rigid sheet under the tiles then make sure it also goes underneath the bottom of the felt and "underlaps" at least 100mm. If it goes above the felt it will be next to useless. When I did my mother's roof I couldn't manage to get it right and ended up taking off the bottom 2 courses of tiles and refixing - it's not a major job. The other thing is when you replace the soffits, make sure there are plenty of ventilation grilles. This will counteract condensation and also provide drainage outlets. Hope your rafter feet aren't rotten - my mum's were. I ended up having to nail on new sections.
Peter
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Yes the problem is localised. The felt is on top of siperex(thick cardboard?) which does not appear to be wet in the loft space so I am assuming the problem is confined to the last two rows of tiles where the angle of slope is almost flat in the roofs run into the gutters. Why do I need to check the loft when its cold?. Why is the water running down the felt instead of the tiles? tiles look ok. What form of rigid sheet can I use?. Would allowing heat into the loft help it has 4 inches of insulation at present. Tom

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Sounds very much as though the felt has perished. It's a very common problem with Type 1F (reinforced) sarking felt.

Because that is when any condensation will be at its worst. All other things being equal, if you don't get condensation on a cold day, you certainly won't get any when it's warmer.

I can't answer that without looking at the roof. If the tiles are almost flat then it could well be the rain is being wind-driven. You don't often get leaks with Marley type single lap tiles unless the tiles are broken or cracked.

Depending on the pitch and the eaves configuation, it is quite possible the old felt is sagging behind the fascia, so that water is ponding on the felt. I don't know much about Siporex board, but if it's cardboard then presumably it goes soft when it's wet, so it sounds totally inappropriate in this position. The felt needs to be supported to create a continuous fall into the gutter - I used 3mm ply for this, nailed on the top edge of the fascia and extending up to the first batten. This was the reason I had to take off the tiles.

If the insulation is at ceiling joist level then I can't see this being effective, it would just be a waste of energy. Above the loft insulaiton it will be impossible to raise the air temperature enough to stop condensation. The moisture is carried up from the rooms below due to vapour pressure and forms on any surfaces cold enough, and you will never warm these sifficiently. The best answer is to provide ventilation, as I mentioned.
Best of luck Peter
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On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 22:39:55 -0000, "tom patton"

Houses built in those days (like mine) had the last few inches of roofing felt bridge that gap between the roof and the gutter and lap over into the gutter. Over the years they suffer from UV and rot, rainwater then doesn't make it to the gutter and runs down over the barge boards/soffits.

Why plastic? The builders in those days had a handy knack of not painting the back face of barge boards/soffits, only the exposed face once it was up. If you were to replace it in wood you could give it a de-luxe treatment both sides before it went up. The houses here had plastic shiplap planking as a decorative feature. It started to deteriorate before the first 10 years was up. Barge boards/soffits even to the original flawed spec lasted 20+.

25/metre seems awful dear to me.

Yes in that free-space gap

There is a product specially marketed for it, quite cheap, it's been discussed on here before, roofing suppliers sell it. It's like DPC material but pre-formed for roofs.

Don't know, don't know if it matters.

Check you haven't already got rot in the trusses/ spar ends.
DG
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