Radiator fixings

After reading Andy Hall's method of flushing out radiators, I'm going to have a go at cleaning out my daughters system. One thing I would like to know before I start is how are the radiators fixed to the wall? Many thanks.
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All the ones I've met are hung on hooks bolted to the wall.
Once the pipework is released the should just lift off (but can be a bit weighty.
Watch for the sludge, I try to get them upside down as soon as possible (bleed valve shut!) before transporting out of the hovel.
Mike r
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Careful: some wall brackets have a "hook" shape at the top of where the radiator clips on, so if you lift it too high then it appears that you can't move it forward away from the wall. Suggest take a good look at the bracket (a wee mirror and a torch might help) before detaching and have two people lift the radiator off until you familiarise yourself with the dynamics involved.

A wee tip: use two kids party balloons and clip these over the radiator tails (the bits that connect onto the floor pipework). These will catch the sludge before it hits the carpet (and it is black filth... horrible stuff).

Finally, make sure that any Thermostatic Radiator valve is absolutely shut. I took a radiator off for a friend and told him to do the decoration behind the radiator and replace the radiator that night for fear of the turned-off TRV opening overnight. Guess what he didn't do... guess why his carpet was covered in a few gallons of radiator water.
HTH
Mungo
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Yuk! If you buy TRVs yourself, or inherit a place where they've been fitted which had an unusually helpful previous owner, you get an alternative non-thermostatic head for just this purpose - works on the same valve mech as the thermostatic head, but works "normally", screwing and unscrewing to control flow. I believe they're intended for use in new builds and commercial fitting - get the plumbers in to fit rads, put the non-delicate and not-worth-ripping-off heads on, get the decorators in, put the TRV heads back when all is done.
Me, though the previous owners had indeed left a couple of these heads behind, I went double-paranoid: as well as shutting off the lockshield and temporarily-not-T valves, I then held a couple of PTFE-tape-wrapped coins (1p, if I remember right) over the bared ends with Suitable Threaded Things out of the plumbing-spares box: I think that the STTs were from scrap washing-machine hose ends. (But then, sometimes I think I have a cat, and I think it enjoys it when I stroke it; but is there really a cat, or am I just making it all up? ;-)
Stefek
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<snipped>

"The Lord knows I am not a cruel man." "Ah, so you believe in God?" "no. The Lord is my cat. At least I think I have a cat, and I think it enjoys it when I stroke it; but is there really a cat?"
Good old DNA
Cheers Clive
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Solipsistically spot-on, that man ;-) He passes on, grieved only by the cat-in-the-vat who imagines us all...
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 19:20:42 +0000 (UTC), mike ring

Never a truer word.
Once you have the radiator disconnected from the pipework the best thing to do (before turning upside down) is to put some sort of tray or other container under one end, and then lift the other end up so that any remaining water and goo is dumped into the tray. Then get a couple of gobs of gaffer tape to sling over the fittings at either end before lifting the radiator off completely - the gaffer tape will prevent spillage hopefully.
Getting sludge dumped onto your carpet is not a good idea. It stains badly. If necessary pull the carpet back before starting this job.
PoP
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Thanks for your advice guys, just one more question - I will be doing the job on my own, but I see several people have said you need two to lift the rads. Surely they are not that heavy are they? The biggest one I have to take off is I think, about 130cm long and single. TIA, Ed

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I agree with you, I have lifted on a 1800x600 double solo, not something I would like to do all day, but def doable.
--
fred

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On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 10:53:43 -0000, "Ed Rear"

They are heavier than you think, but that size is easily manageable. When it comes to double panels, it's a question of whether there are small ribs fitted between the panels along the top that can be used to get your fingers underneath. Otherwise, best to have a person each end.
Make sure the pipes and valves are out of the way - you don't want to catch them and bend anything as you manoeuvre the radiator away. I stuff some kitchen roll in the valve tails and tie small plastic bags around with rubber bands, put old towels on the floor and don't *ever* tilt the radiator. Often there is a pool of intensely black gunge lying at the very very bottom, waiting to ooze out and permanently stain any carpet.
PS You do know there is a small risk that flushing out old systems can lead to leaks as some of the "structural" rust is removed ?
--
John
Mail john rather than nospam...
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