Punching through porcelain taphole blanks

How ?
From above or below, with something pointy or blunt.
Or should I leave it for a passing plumber ..
Let me know,
Thanks
Paul.
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On 1 Oct 2003 18:33:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com (Zymurgy) wrote:

Ive seen this question in this ng b4 not so long ago have I not ?? Stuart ---------
Remove YOURPANTS before E-mailing Me
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Stuart wrote:

I asked, the answer didn't surface. Most seemed to think I'd be sending in a video to 'You've been framed'. The solution turned out to be: Drill a hole through the centre using an old HSS bit, roto only. Chip out the taphole gradually from the top downwards. In addition I broke through the glazed surface using a tile cutting bit around the circumference of the hole. Once you have chipped out the majority, it's quite easy to file the hole.
Punch-out doesn't equal one hit from a club hammer
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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"Toby" wrote

Cool, thanks a lot for this.
I will think twice before approaching it with my finest club hammer and drift (which I had in mind :-)
Cheers,
Paul.
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(Zymurgy) wrote

Or my finest drill bit. I tried the HSS bit, then I tried a brand new SDS bit.
Nothing makes a dent in the tap blank :-0
Was very tempted to use SDS hammer, but had major visions of shearing off the corner of the sink !
Cheers,
Paul.
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The last item on this page is what you need:
http://www.tradetiler.com/acatalog/Hole_Cutting.html
You can also buy them individually.
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"BigWallop" wrote

eek. They're pricey.
I've got through the blank with a tile drill, i'm now nibbling slowly toward the edge.
More updates and jpg's of broken sink to follow ;)
Cheers,
Paul.
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(Zymurgy)

Ok, to answer the confused, concerned (including those who responded via e-mail !!), the deed is done.
I drilled through the blank with a tile drill, then bought some cheapo 'mounted stones' (2.50 for 5 assorted)
Stick the little cone shaped one in the drill and gently go through from the shiny side backwards into the blank. This will make your drill and the sink get extremely hot so take it in 3 or so bursts. [1]
Throw away the small one and put in the big cone. Repeat as above.
After about 40 mins drilling (with pauses to let things cool down) you will be rewarded with a hole big enough to put the tap through.
Here endeth todays lesson bretheren.
Cheers,
Paul.
[1] If the epoxy sticking the stone to the drill shaft melts, you've overdone it :)
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From above using a nail punch. Punch into the centre first then "nibble" the hole larger working from the centre toward the edge. It's fairly easy to do but a tad nerve-wracking. No need for the drills that someone else mentioned.
Never ever do it from below that will cause large flakes of the glaze to break off. Also watch out when you have a tap fixed through the hole if you ever need to remove the tap, don't catch the threads on the tap on the edges of the hole as you remove it. Again if you do it will flake off large chunks of glaze.
--
Mathematicians, please don't drink and derive.

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