Practical aspect of doing continuity tests

I know all the theory (!) now about how to carry out the continuity tests on rings circuits, connecting wires together, testing at each socket, etc.
On a practical note, how do people test at the socket? Unscrew it and check at terminals with probes? Poke probes in front? Use a topless plug? None of these?
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Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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this what you are 'supposed' to do
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Book/8.4.2.htm
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 00:59:44 UTC, "Chris Oates" <none> wrote:

Sorry if I didn't make it clear, but that's what I meant by 'I know the theory'. It's the aspect of sctually making the connections for testing that I'm concerned with.
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Bob Eager
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Hi Bob,
When I do these tests, I use a special test lead - 13A plug with a few inches of wire to SHROUDED 4mm plugs that I built (with a large "TEST ONLY" label on it) - which then plugs into my continuity tester, and test into the actual socket itself.
John
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ONLY"
the
For those that have to do this on a regular basis I wonder whether there is merit in making a special test box which has a push-to-make switch to connect the Live and Neutral to the shrouded sockets and some sort of mains lamp or neon or mains buzzer wired before it. Therefore on the (rare) ocassions when you accidentally push the plug into a live socket you will get some warning about the consequences of pushing the button and ruining your multimeter!
Further, how about a mains relay that disconnects the shrouded sockets when there is mains potential between Live and Neutral.
Just an idea.
Mungo
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 10:46:23 UTC, "Mungo Henning"

Sounds good...in my case it's going to the continuity/insulation tester, but the same principle applies.
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Bob Eager
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wrote:

is
connect
or
Sigh... you only think of the greater picture once you press "Send": Any gadget across Live and Neutral may have a resistance which would bias the resistance checks wot you are using the meter for.
Something to take account of.
But maybe a neon and a 470k resistor wouldn't hurt...
Mungo
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 10:23:47 UTC, "John Watson"

Ah, now, that sounds like a good idea! I was toying with the idea of a 13A plug and trailing leads, but hadn't thought of using 4mm leads directly. That would be a good deal safer than bare wires and croc clips...
I just KNEW there had to be a simple, reasonably safe way...
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Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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I was in the process of designing a small box with 4mm *sockets* and a 13A plug so that I could plug the probe leads from whatever I happen to be using (insulation/continuity tester, multimeter "A", multimeter "B"), all of which have different socket spacings but similar probes which will fit 4mm sockets.
Hwyl!
M.
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Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Don't fight technology, live with it: http://www.livtech.co.uk /
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