OT: Chemistry book recomendation

I am sure one of you chaps (of chapesses) out there can help:
On various occasions, discussions on this group turn to matters chemical. This has always been one of the areas of science that I seem to keep missing the opportunity to study! At school we did Physics and Biology - combined science including chemistry did not come in until the year after ours. I tried again when doing A Levels - but the chemistry class clashed with the Physics group I wanted to be in. At university other than materials technology there was not much else related on offer.
Hence the question - can anyone recommend a good chemistry book? Not for someone who plans to take an exam in the subject - more for general interest in such things and how they relate to the world about us.
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Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

At O or A level standard even a small public library should have something to suit your taste.
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As the other post said, go to the library and look at a selection of books. When I was doing A level and HNC chemistry many years ago, I looked at lots of different books as I could not get on with certain authors styles.Thats the important thing, find an author/s whose approach you are happy with. Enjoy chemistry, it does not have to be the dry subject it appears to be.
HTH
Dave
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And you were born knowing all about ms windows....??


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Since the changeover in methods of teaching and standards changed some time ago, you will not find one as easily as I did in a second hand book shop.
Chemistry; Facts Patterns and Principles by Kneen, Rogers and Simpson.
Old A level standard but still readable if a little dry. What I like about it is the minimalism in the pictures department. Most science text books these days look like they were written by people who work for the BBC or AOL.
Have you looked for Chem forums online? About.com do a homework help page as well as running educational forae. http://chemistry.about.com / http://about.com/homework /
Hmmmm.... just been back there.... very childish.
Encyclopaedia Britannica is very cheap these days. There are other more chemistry specific CD and DVD's available too. Try your local computer fair.
And finally there are quite good OU programmes available on night-time TV. Leave your video running through likely spots. Some of it is crap. Do you have digital TV?
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How about a course from MIT
http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Chemistry/index.htm
mike r
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A superb introduction to chemistry is covered in the Open University course notes for " S101 A Science Foundation Course". This assumes no prior chemistry knowledge. Two other courses leading on from S101 at second level are "S246 Organic Chemistry" and "S247 Inorganic Chemistry", the course notes for which are also really excellent. I have seen second hand course notes available for sale, although not very often. Try e-bay?
As far as text books are concerned, have a look at "Chemistry in context" by Graham Hill and John Holman, ISBN 0-17-438401-7.
You can also get some good, relatively cheap, "O Level" and "A Level Chemistry books in WHS etc - best to have a browse.
CRB
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On 30 Nov 2003 06:41:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@compuserve.com (CRB) wrote:

For a bit more indepth, the branches of chemistry generally get split apart into organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. A particularly good example of orgainc chemistry is McMurray - organic chemistry (very easy to follow from the very simple to the very complex. Inorganic chemistry - atkins and others, and physical chemistry - atkins (very dry, very thorough, complete bugger to follow ;)), if you want to venture into biochemistry, you cannot go wrong with lubert stryers all encompassing 'biochemistry'
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and quite beautifully (and informatively illustrated)

For nostalgia's sake (having done a year's biochem before swapping to stamp collecting, I mean Comp Sci) I browsed through the most recent edition in the Uni bookshop last week; cockle-warming to see the Man's still going and inspiring future generations.
Stefek
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On 1 Dec 2003 17:17:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hp.com wrote:

Even though i will get no further educational use from my well thumbed and extremely bookmarked and highlighted edition (3rd). I was thinking of picking up a new copy and reading through, to see what has changed in the general knowledge area of biochem, i certainly have no time for current journal browsing nowadays.
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"Chemistry in the marketplace" by Ben Selinger ((Amazon.com product link shortened)70225398/sr=1-1/r ef=sr_1_0_1/026-5328708-7080433)
Very readable and much of interest to the DIYer especially the section on adhesives, paint and concrete
--
Laurie snipped-for-privacy@elessar.org.uk



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