New elec regs - my questionnaire!

I seen a few posts recently that mention a change I the law relating to who is allowed to install/test (domestic) electrical wiring.
As I am many years out of date with much of today's regs could someone please reply respond these queries:
Is there indeed a change in the law coming up? When?
If so, just who will be legally allowed to do the work?
What qualifications (and or level experience) are to be accepted?
Is such a person required to provided to the customer, documentation indicating the work has be carried out to ? specification? If so I guess the installer *has* to have third party insurance.
I've also heard on TV news that house sellers will be required to provide a cert. to the buyer to say that the house has been "tested" or in some way complies with the regs. a) What regs? b) Seller pays? c) Much work for "testers" = good? Bad for unqualified but well-experienced people = much friction? d) Views on how this may pan-out - will it be watered down so many existing unqualified people with elec. business will be still be able to continue their work?
A personal bit OT: I qualified back in the good old days of 1975. (5 year apprentice served and CGLI Full Tech Cert.). I've been thinking about returning to doing electrical work - maybe part-time. My training was in heavy industrial electrics/electronics but included little domestic work - although I have done some. I have the On-Site guild and most of that seems clear enough (apart from the fun and games with the inevitable earthing arrangements :-) . No doubt my qualifications will be completely usless today, but I wonder, does it mean I shall have to re-qualify in order to begin domestic electrical installation work?
What publications and courses should I be looking at?
(Aside: I have a degree in elec. eng. but that probably too is irrelevant to performing legally certified domestic installations with this latest legislation?)
Anyone living in the Nottingham area interested in maybe teaming up? Must not be afraid of hard work, honest, conscientious GSOH and have own tools (no rip-off artists or cowboys need apply :-) )
Many thanks
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I don't pretend to know the details but electrical installations have been part of the Scottish Building Regs for a long while (though at a pure guess perhaps only when part of a larger job). From a quick Google:
"8. IS IT NECESSARY TO OBTAIN A CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION WHEN MY BUILDING WORK IS FINISHED?
Yes. You should complete and return to your local authority an application for a certificate of completion, together with a certificate of compliance for the electrical installation where appropriate when the warrant work is complete"
http://www.highland.gov.uk/plintra/devbc/bc_questions.htm
So this would suggest that if you build something like an extension they will want to see a test certificate
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Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
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You can do this test certificate yourself though.
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Andrew Gabriel

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On 22 Aug 2003 16:54:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Thanks for the confirmation. I have just applied to join the next C&G2391 course at the local college. If I get through then great, if I don't then at least being aware of what is involved will be helpful to me.

My intention is to try and meet the NICEIC requirements which are detailed on this web page:
http://www.niceic.org.uk/nonapproved/requirements.html
The only part I might expect to have difficulty with is with respect to "make available for assessment sufficient completed electrical work across the range normally undertaken. The work must have been carried out during the previous six months .....". I won't be applying to NICEIC for at least six months, and in that period I have no idea how many light fittings (and similarly scoped) projects I might have worked on. It could be zero or more.
It isn't and has never been my intention that I will work on the full range of electrical installation work. I restrict myself to performing the basic electrical jobs around the home, replace light fittings, broken sockets, maybe even the odd extra spur to a ring main.
That should keep the NICEIC drone happy :)
Andrew
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This is almost certainly me being thick, but...
"NICEIC Approved Contractors are required to have traded, directly undertaking electrical installation work, for at least twelve months under its existing trading title, although this period may reduce to 6 months from April 2003"
How is that going to work from April 2004, when you (supposedly) can't do the work unless you are in the NICEIC? How would anyone "start" in the trade? Can't join the NICEIC because you have no experience; can't get any experience because you're not in the NICEIC...
Cheers, David.
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On 27 Aug 2003 05:52:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@postmaster.co.uk (David Robinson) wrote:

Seems like the proverbial chicken and egg, doesn't it?
As I read it there would be two ways:-
1) Join a NICEIC approved firm and train under supervision - i.e. an apprenticeship kind of idea
2) Go it alone, and have work inspected by an approved inspector each time. This needs understanding customers of course. Then after 6 months apply to NICEIC.
.andy
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Tony Bryer wrote:

Thank you for the link - Highland Council covers my area!
Sheila
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Potentially next April unless something (hopefully) bad happens to the government in the meantime.

Anybody will be allowed to do the work - BUTmembers of NICEIC will be able to self certify compliance with a proposed new part P to the Building Regulations. Other mortals will have to execute a building notice at their local authority building control department, which will carry a fee. That will apply to other professionals carrying out electrical work or to DIY.

Take a look at the ODPM and NICEIC web sites for full details.

In effect BS7671.

Almost certainly, but then it will be reflected in prices.

I suspect much ignoring and unenforcability, therefore pointless.

I think that BCOs are going to love it.

Look at the NICEIC web site. They are operating the closed shop on behalf of Napoleon Prescott.

.andy
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